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The #1 source for immediate, long-term relief for dogs suffering from degenerative diseases like hip dysplasia, OCD and arthritis.

We are specialists in the treatment of canine joint disease and its accompanying pain.

Let us help put an end to your dog’s suffering, joint stiffness, pain, immobility, and poor quality of life. Our proven products will help you easily accomplish this without the use of drugs or invasive surgery.

Joint Issues

  • Hip Dysplasia
  • Arthritis
  • Osteochondritis (OCD)
  • Stiffness/Inflammation
  • Ligament Tears
  • Growing Pains
  • Mobility Problems
  • Joint Pain
  • Back/Spinal Problems
  • Hypertrophic Osteodystrophy (HOD)

Symptoms

Is your pet becoming less active, less playful, or desiring shorter walks? The following symptoms could be early signs of OCD, Arthritis or Hip Dysplasia.

  • Moving more slowly
  • Difficulty getting up
  • Weight shift to another leg
  • Personality change
  • Reluctant to walk, jump or play
  • Refuses using stairs or the car
  • Change in appetite
  • Change in behavior
  • Muscle atrophy
  • Lagging behind
  • Yelping when touched
  • Limping
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Archive for the ‘Dog Diseases’ Category

When Your Dog Dies: Getting Help From Pet Owners

Monday, June 20th, 2011


When your dog dies it can be a traumatic experience, and for some, it is the equivalent of losing a human member of the family. If your pet was an integral part of your life, your grief is likely to be intense, and at times overwhelming.

The best thing you can do for your own well-being is to surround yourself with people who understand the bond that exists between a human and their beloved pet. People who don’t share your love of pets or have never owned one, will not understand the deep sense of loss you experience. If you have to make the painful decision to euthanize your dog, it is very important that you be there for your pet and give it the ultimate gift of a peaceful and pain-free end.

Some people are lucky to have another dog to help them through the sadness of losing a loving companion animal. Pets also feel the loss of their friend, and together you may find comfort in sharing your sadness, even though it is with an animal rather than a human. Animals will never be unfeeling or judge you, telling you to “Get over it,” or “It’s time to get on with your life and forget your dog.”

It helps to understand your feelings of loss when your dog dies. The bond that we form with our dogs can be deep and fulfilling, and the loss of a beloved animal can have an impact on us that is as painful as the loss of a family member or friend. This bond is what makes the connections with our pets rich and rewarding; and also what makes the grieving process so difficult. The greater your love for your pet, the deeper the sense of loss will be when they are gone.

The length of time a person grieves for the loss of their pet is often very different among people. Grief is an internal and personal response to the loss of a pet and there are identifiable stages of grief that most people experience. By understanding the grieving process, you can learn to accept and manage your grief, and help other family members or friends who share your feelings of loss.

There are many stages of grief, but not everyone experiences all of them, nor in the same order. These stages include denial, anger, guilt, depression, and acceptance, followed by the assurance of a life yet to be lived. Grief often comes in waves and can be brought on by something as simple as remembering how you and your pet used to spend loving times together. Seeing other people enjoying their pets can bring back good memories of you and your pet together and can seem overwhelming at times.

Many people immediately get rid of all the things their pet used every day – food and water bowls, collar and leashes, dog food, the dog’s bed, and many other items. This makes it easier to accept your loss because you are not being constantly reminded that your pet is no longer with you. If your pet’s death was sudden, or the time was short between accepting the finality of compassionate euthanasia, the more difficult it can be to accept the loss and the stronger the denial.

Anger and guilt often follow denial. Your anger may be directed toward people you love and respect, which often
includes family and friends. People coping with the death of a pet will often say things that they don’t really mean, and unintentionally hurt people they don’t mean to offend.

Some pet owners may feel guilty or blame themselves for not recognizing the seriousness of their dog’s illness earlier and doing something about it sooner. Others may feel guilty because they could not afford the cost of further treatment to help their dog.

Depression is a common experience after the death of a beloved dog. You will probably find yourself frequently crying, and day-to-day tasks can seem impossible to accomplish. You may also feel isolated and alone, avoiding the company of your friends and family. Some people find it hard to get out of bed in the morning, especially if the morning routine included caring for the dog’s needs.

There may be times when you wonder if you can go on living without your pet. The answer is a resounding YES. Eventually you will be able to handle your sadness and begin to accept the death of your pet. When you can remember your dog and the happy times you spent together without feeling intense grief and emotional pain, you are on the road to recovery. Acceptance does not mean you will no longer feel the sense of loss, only that you have come to accept the fact that your dog has died and will always live in your heart and memories.

Although everyone experiences some stages of grief, grieving is always a personal process one goes through and some people will take longer than others to come to terms with denial, anger, guilt, and depression. If you understand that these are normal reactions almost every dog owner goes through when their beloved pet dies, you will be better equipped to cope with your feelings.

Sometimes family and friends may not realize how important your pet was to you or the intensity of your grief, and may make remarks at times that seem cruel and uncaring. Understand that these comments are not meant to hurt you.

The death of a beloved dog can be extremely upsetting, especially if you had to euthanize your pet. The pain that comes from having to choose euthanasia, initially makes people vow that they will never have another pet dog because they could not stand to go through this kind of pain again. The thought of loving and eventually losing another dog may seem unbearable. Know that if you think these feelings will never go away, be assured that they too will pass with time. The decision of when, or even if ever, to bring a new dog into your life, is a personal one. Although you can never replace the dog you loved and lost, it is possible to find another pet to share your life with.

The length of time from birth to old age is much shorter for dogs than it is for people, and the death of a pet is a normal part of the life cycle. No matter what you do or to what extent you go through to keep your dog alive, death cannot be avoided. Understanding and compassion from friends and family can help you manage the grief of losing a best friend when your dog dies.

Arthritis in Older Dogs

Monday, May 2nd, 2011


Just like humans, older dogs are susceptible to many diseases, arthritis and hip dysplasia being two of the most common ailments. If your dog is affected by arthritis, there are some things you’ll need to do to make sure it’s comfortable at all times and has the ability – and mobility – to enjoy its “golden years.”

Arthritis is a problem affecting a dog’s joints and is caused by a natural reduction in glucosamine which is essential for healthy bones. A dog’s joints become swollen and painful, making it difficult to move about. Most dogs with arthritis will suffer from pain when attempting certain activities like walking or climbing stairs. Dogs with arthritis also require a special diet containing additional vitamins and minerals.

The diet for a dog with arthritis needs to be easily digestible and should contain fewer proteins. Carbohydrates should be eliminated from the dog’s diet as much as possible. If the dog is obese, a weight loss diet is absolutely necessary because the extra weight can cause additional pain in the dog’s joints. Senior dogs are the most apt to suffer from arthritis and a vet may recommend a wet food diet for an older dog.

Arthritis in older dogs will require administering supplements that help with joint support and make the dog more comfortable. Winston’s Joint System is an all-natural formula developed by a Naturopathic Doctor to heal his own beloved dog. For over 20 years, this proven formula has been helping dogs find relief from the pain and stiffness caused by arthritis and hip dysplasia.

Dogs suffering from either of these debilitating diseases also need extra vitamins and minerals which can easily be provided with a regimen of Winston’s Senior Complete Multi, the most powerful and complete once-a-day multi vitamin for dogs 5 years and older.

The dog will also benefit from a pain relieving supplement like Winston’s Pain Formula, the most powerful natural pain relief product on the market today. It’s fast acting and highly effective. Winston’s Pain Formula works exceptionally well with Winston’s Joint System to give comfort to an ailing dog.

A dog with arthritis will need a soft, comfortable bed to ease the pain. The best dog bed I’ve found for my dog is the Canine Cooler Bed that provides comfort second to none. The fluid-enhanced design of this special bed offers a dry, lasting cooling effect combined with superior cushioning support. It will help keep a dog comfortable year-round. You should definitely check this bed out if your dog is suffering from arthritis or hip dysplasia. My dog loves it so much he’s taken to going into my bedroom and laying down on it throughout the day.

Arthritis in an older dog can be more debilitating than it is for younger dogs. Younger dogs are usually able to handle the pain of arthritis a little easier and they may limp or slow down their movements, whereas an older, senior dog is unable to do the same.

Hip Dysplasia in Great Danes

Tuesday, December 28th, 2010


Hip dysplasia is a debilitating disease that affects the hip joints in dogs. It is commonly found among large breed dogs but also can occur in medium and small size breeds. Certain breeds like Great Danes are more susceptible to hip dysplasia, and the disease is more common in pure-bred dogs than in mixed breeds.

Hip dysplasia is caused by the malformation of the hip in a dog. This usually occurs at a young age when they are still growing and the bones are being formed. The ball and socket of the hip joint grows unevenly, causing the right and left hind legs to become affected. This usually happens as a result of the muscles, ligaments and connective tissues surrounding and supporting the hip joint becoming lax. Instead of the bones growing towards each other, they grow apart as the ligament and capsule holding the bones together become strained and stretched. The bones are no longer in alignment and put pressure on the nerves, which causes the symptoms and signs associated with the disease.

Symptoms of hip dysplasia include moving more slowly, difficulty in getting up or lying down, reluctance to walk, jump or play, refusing to use stairs or get into the car, muscle atrophy, limping, yelping when touched, changes in appetite, and personality changes. Both older and younger dogs suffering from hip dysplasia feel the most discomfort in cold, damp weather.

Great Danes who develop hip dysplasia or arthritis suffer from pain and stiffness in their joints which greatly diminishes their ability to live a quality life and remain active. They feel pain after exercising and during their normal daily activities. Their hind legs tend to be stiff during and after exercising. They may also find it hard to stand on their hind feet in the morning and often try to avoid putting any pressure at all on their hind legs. If it gets too painful a dog will find it hard to stand up without help from a human.

When a Great Dane is diagnosed with hip dysplasia and the choices for treatment seem limited to expensive surgery or questionable drugs, I recommend you begin treating your dog with Winston’s Joint System, an all-natural formula developed by a Naturopathic Doctor to heal his own beloved dog. This proven formula has been giving relief from pain and stiffness to all breeds and ages of dogs for more than 20 years.

Although there is no actual cure for canine hip dysplasia, arthritis, or osteochondrosis (OCD), regular treatment with Winston’s Joint System will give immediate and long-term relief without drugs.

Winston’s is a combination of three, totally-natural whole food supplements developed by a Naturopathic Doctor for his own dog. There are no side-effects because it’s just good whole food. In addition, there are no dosage problems because the dog’s body uses only what it needs.

Although canine hip dysplasia (CHD) may remain unseen in some dogs, early detection is critical. The first step to determining whether a Great Dane has hip dysplasia is through a careful physical examination by a veterinarian who will observe the dog as it sits, stands, and walks. This is the first measure to check for characteristic signs of hip dysplasia such as a side-to-side swinging gait, lameness, and arched back which is caused by shifting weight forward, or the presence of overdeveloped front-leg and shoulder muscles.

X-rays are the easiest way to diagnose hip dysplasia in a dog. A vet will evaluate the joints and take into consideration any symptoms like those listed above because sometimes an x-ray won’t reveal the full extent of the dog’s pain. The vet will also consider the dog’s movements and any evidence of lameness before making a diagnosis.

The veterinarian will move the dog’s hip joint to assess its range of motion and check for pain with the joint extended. The vet will also listen for the “click” of the hip popping out of joint and for any grating sound of bone on bone that indicates cartilage loss.

A Great Dane is a wonderful, proud animal and deserves the love and attention of a caring owner. When hip dysplasia, arthritis, or OCD strikes, the first thing to do is schedule a visit to your vet. If surgery is not recommended then you should start your dog on a regimen of Winston’s Joint System.

Hip Dysplasia in Labradors

Tuesday, December 14th, 2010


Hip dysplasia in Labradors is a genetic disease that can cause crippling, lameness and severe arthritic pain in a dog’s joints. For Labradors that are genetically prone to hip dysplasia, symptoms can occur in puppies that are just a few months old or they can strike later in a dog’s life.

There are a number of causative factors that determine whether a dog will develop hip dysplasia. The most important being the genetic make-up of the dog (whether its parents and grand-parents had hip dysplasia), the type of diet being fed the dog, and obesity, which puts additional strain and weight on hip joints that become weak from hip dysplasia, arthritis, or osteochondrosis (OCD).

It is not possible to predict when or even if hip dysplasia will occur in a dog, however, there are some easily noticeable symptoms of hip dysplasia which include moving more slowly, difficulty in getting up or lying down, reluctance to walk, jump or play, refusing to use stairs or get into the car, muscle atrophy, limping, yelping when touched, changes in appetite, and personality changes.

Labradors who develop hip dysplasia, arthritis or OCD, suffer from pain and stiffness in their joints which greatly diminishes their ability to live a quality life and remain active.

When a Lab is diagnosed with hip dysplasia and the choices for treatment seem limited to expensive surgery or questionable drugs, I recommend you begin treating your dog with Winston’s Joint System, an all-natural formula developed by a Naturopathic Doctor to heal his own beloved dog. This proven formula has been giving relief from pain and stiffness to all breeds and ages of dogs for more than 20 years.

All Labradors have different temperaments, different pain thresholds and different bodies. Some may be able to cope with the pain and discomfort for a long time before showing any signs of hip dysplasia or arthritis.

X-rays are the easiest way to diagnose hip dysplasia in a dog. A vet will evaluate the joints and take into consideration any symptoms like those listed above because sometimes an x-ray won’t reveal the full extent of the dog’s pain. The vet will also consider the dog’s movements and any evidence of lameness before making a diagnosis.

Although there is no actual cure for canine hip dysplasia, arthritis, or osteochondrosis (OCD), regular treatment with Winston’s Joint System will give immediate and long-term relief without drugs.

Winston’s is a combination of three, totally-natural whole food supplements developed by a Naturopathic Doctor for his own dog. There are no side-effects because it’s just good whole food. In addition, there are no dosage problems because the dog’s body uses only what it needs.

Exercise and weight control are also vitally important. A dog’s weight, together with exercise, helps in the development of cartilage growth and aids in reducing pain and discomfort.

Surgery is normally only considered in cases of Labrador hip dysplasia if all other treatments have failed to improve the dog’s condition. This procedure is expensive and the recovery time for a dog can be considerably lengthened if the post-surgical dog is not cared for properly. The desired result of any surgical procedure is to provide an acceptable quality of life for the Lab, so surgery should be considered only if a vet is reasonably certain of success.

The most successful joint modification surgery involves reshaping or replacing the femur, or realigning the hip socket. This surgery is only recommended for younger dogs. Older and heavier dogs who suffer from hip dysplasia are generally not considered good candidates for the surgery. There is a fairly high incidence of mortality for older dogs undergoing this procedure and that is something you need to discuss frankly with your vet if surgery is recommended.

You want your beautiful Lab to be with you as long as possible so please watch for any signs or symptoms of hip dysplasia or arthritis, and begin early treatment of your pet with Winston’s Joint System.

Hip Dysplasia in Golden Retrievers

Tuesday, December 7th, 2010


Hip dysplasia in Golden Retrievers is a genetic disorder, an inherited instability of the dog’s joints which is common in the breed.

The Golden Retriever was first developed in Scotland, the original breeding being a cross between a male yellow-colored Retriever with a Tweed Water Spaniel female dog.

Some variations exist between the British type Golden Retrievers prevalent throughout Europe and Australia, and those of American lines, and these differences are reflected in the breed standard. The muzzle of the British type of dog is wider and shorter, and its forehead is blockier. It has shorter legs, with a slightly deeper chest, and a shorter tail. Its features make it generally heavier than the American Retriever. The eyes of the European type are noted for their roundness and darkness as contrasted with the triangular or slanted composition of American Golden Retrievers.

Retriever’s coat colors range from a light golden color to dark golden. The Golden’s coat can also be mahogany colored, which is referred to as “redhead”. As a Golden grows older, its coat can become darker or lighter, along with a noticeable whitening of the fur on and around the muzzle. A puppy’s color is usually much lighter than its adult coat.

Golden Retrievers shed moderately to heavily, shedding year round, especially in the spring and early summer. The coat and undercoat are dense and waterproof, and may be straight or moderately wavy.

The temperament of the Golden Retriever is described as kindly, friendly and confident. They are equally friendly with both strangers and those familiar to them. Their trusting, gentle disposition makes them a poor guard dog. Unprovoked aggression or hostility towards people, dogs or other animals is not in keeping with the character of the breed. The typical Golden Retriever is calm and naturally intelligent, with an exceptional eagerness to please.

Golden Retrievers are also noted for their intelligence, ranking fourth after the Border Collie, Poodle, and German Shepherd. Goldens are one of the brightest dogs ranked by obedience command trainability. These dogs are also renowned for their patience with children.

The average life span for a Golden Retriever is 11 to 11½ years.

Golden Retrievers are susceptible to genetic disorders like hip and elbow dysplasia which is common in the breed. Hip dysplasia is an inherited instability of the dog’s joints. This instability can be compounded by environmental factors such as injury to the joint and by dietary factors such as pushing rapid growth in puppies.

It is not possible to predict when or even if hip dysplasia will occur in a Golden. However, there are some easily noticeable symptoms of hip dysplasia which include moving more slowly, difficulty in getting up or lying down, reluctance to walk, jump or play, refusing to use stairs or get into the car, muscle atrophy, limping, yelping when touched, changes in appetite, and personality changes.

X-rays are the easiest way to diagnose hip dysplasia in a Golden Retriever. A vet will evaluate the joints and take into consideration any symptoms like those listed above because sometimes an x-ray won’t reveal the full extent of the dog’s pain. The vet will also consider the dog’s movements and any evidence of lameness before making a diagnosis.

When a Golden is diagnosed with hip dysplasia and the choices for treatment seem limited to expensive surgery or questionable drugs, many holistic vets recommend you begin treating your dog with Winston’s Joint System, an all-natural formula developed by a Naturopathic Doctor to heal his own beloved dog. This proven formula has been giving relief from pain and stiffness to all breeds and ages of dogs for more than 20 years.

Although there is no actual cure for canine hip dysplasia, arthritis, or osteochondrosis (OCD), regular treatment with Winston’s Joint System will give immediate and long-term relief without drugs.

Winston’s is a combination of three, totally-natural whole food supplements developed by a Naturopathic Doctor for his own dog. There are no side-effects because it’s just good whole food. In addition, there are no dosage problems because the dog’s body uses only what it needs.

Surgery is normally only considered in cases of hip dysplasia if all other treatments have failed to improve the dog’s condition. This procedure is expensive and the recovery time for a dog can be considerably lengthened if the post-surgical dog is not cared for properly. The desired result of any surgical procedure is to provide an acceptable quality of life for the dog, so surgery should be considered only if a vet is reasonably certain of success.

The best way to treat hip dysplasia is of course to prevent it. Before buying a puppy, be sure it has been certified free of hip dysplasia. Certified-free parents are not guaranteed to have dysplasia-free pups.

You want your beautiful Golden to be with you as long as possible so be alert to any signs or symptoms of hip dysplasia or arthritis, and begin early treatment of your pet with Winston’s Joint System.

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