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The #1 source for immediate, long-term relief for dogs suffering from degenerative diseases like hip dysplasia, OCD and arthritis.

We are specialists in the treatment of canine joint disease and its accompanying pain.

Let us help put an end to your dog’s suffering, joint stiffness, pain, immobility, and poor quality of life. Our proven products will help you easily accomplish this without the use of drugs or invasive surgery.

Joint Issues

  • Hip Dysplasia
  • Arthritis
  • Osteochondritis (OCD)
  • Stiffness/Inflammation
  • Ligament Tears
  • Growing Pains
  • Mobility Problems
  • Joint Pain
  • Back/Spinal Problems
  • Hypertrophic Osteodystrophy (HOD)

Symptoms

Is your pet becoming less active, less playful, or desiring shorter walks? The following symptoms could be early signs of OCD, Arthritis or Hip Dysplasia.

  • Moving more slowly
  • Difficulty getting up
  • Weight shift to another leg
  • Personality change
  • Reluctant to walk, jump or play
  • Refuses using stairs or the car
  • Change in appetite
  • Change in behavior
  • Muscle atrophy
  • Lagging behind
  • Yelping when touched
  • Limping
We Can Help!
 

Archive for the ‘Dog Diseases’ Category

Arthritis in Older Dogs

Monday, May 2nd, 2011


Just like humans, older dogs are susceptible to many diseases, arthritis and hip dysplasia being two of the most common ailments. If your dog is affected by arthritis, there are some things you’ll need to do to make sure it’s comfortable at all times and has the ability – and mobility – to enjoy its “golden years.”

Arthritis is a problem affecting a dog’s joints and is caused by a natural reduction in glucosamine which is essential for healthy bones. A dog’s joints become swollen and painful, making it difficult to move about. Most dogs with arthritis will suffer from pain when attempting certain activities like walking or climbing stairs. Dogs with arthritis also require a special diet containing additional vitamins and minerals.

The diet for a dog with arthritis needs to be easily digestible and should contain fewer proteins. Carbohydrates should be eliminated from the dog’s diet as much as possible. If the dog is obese, a weight loss diet is absolutely necessary because the extra weight can cause additional pain in the dog’s joints. Senior dogs are the most apt to suffer from arthritis and a vet may recommend a wet food diet for an older dog.

Arthritis in older dogs will require administering supplements that help with joint support and make the dog more comfortable. Winston’s Joint System is an all-natural formula developed by a Naturopathic Doctor to heal his own beloved dog. For over 20 years, this proven formula has been helping dogs find relief from the pain and stiffness caused by arthritis and hip dysplasia.

Dogs suffering from either of these debilitating diseases also need extra vitamins and minerals which can easily be provided with a regimen of Winston’s Senior Complete Multi, the most powerful and complete once-a-day multi vitamin for dogs 5 years and older.

The dog will also benefit from a pain relieving supplement like Winston’s Pain Formula, the most powerful natural pain relief product on the market today. It’s fast acting and highly effective. Winston’s Pain Formula works exceptionally well with Winston’s Joint System to give comfort to an ailing dog.

A dog with arthritis will need a soft, comfortable bed to ease the pain. The best dog bed I’ve found for my dog is the Canine Cooler Bed that provides comfort second to none. The fluid-enhanced design of this special bed offers a dry, lasting cooling effect combined with superior cushioning support. It will help keep a dog comfortable year-round. You should definitely check this bed out if your dog is suffering from arthritis or hip dysplasia. My dog loves it so much he’s taken to going into my bedroom and laying down on it throughout the day.

Arthritis in an older dog can be more debilitating than it is for younger dogs. Younger dogs are usually able to handle the pain of arthritis a little easier and they may limp or slow down their movements, whereas an older, senior dog is unable to do the same.

Hip Dysplasia in Great Danes

Tuesday, December 28th, 2010


Hip dysplasia is a debilitating disease that affects the hip joints in dogs. It is commonly found among large breed dogs but also can occur in medium and small size breeds. Certain breeds like Great Danes are more susceptible to hip dysplasia, and the disease is more common in pure-bred dogs than in mixed breeds.

Hip dysplasia is caused by the malformation of the hip in a dog. This usually occurs at a young age when they are still growing and the bones are being formed. The ball and socket of the hip joint grows unevenly, causing the right and left hind legs to become affected. This usually happens as a result of the muscles, ligaments and connective tissues surrounding and supporting the hip joint becoming lax. Instead of the bones growing towards each other, they grow apart as the ligament and capsule holding the bones together become strained and stretched. The bones are no longer in alignment and put pressure on the nerves, which causes the symptoms and signs associated with the disease.

Symptoms of hip dysplasia include moving more slowly, difficulty in getting up or lying down, reluctance to walk, jump or play, refusing to use stairs or get into the car, muscle atrophy, limping, yelping when touched, changes in appetite, and personality changes. Both older and younger dogs suffering from hip dysplasia feel the most discomfort in cold, damp weather.

Great Danes who develop hip dysplasia or arthritis suffer from pain and stiffness in their joints which greatly diminishes their ability to live a quality life and remain active. They feel pain after exercising and during their normal daily activities. Their hind legs tend to be stiff during and after exercising. They may also find it hard to stand on their hind feet in the morning and often try to avoid putting any pressure at all on their hind legs. If it gets too painful a dog will find it hard to stand up without help from a human.

When a Great Dane is diagnosed with hip dysplasia and the choices for treatment seem limited to expensive surgery or questionable drugs, I recommend you begin treating your dog with Winston’s Joint System, an all-natural formula developed by a Naturopathic Doctor to heal his own beloved dog. This proven formula has been giving relief from pain and stiffness to all breeds and ages of dogs for more than 20 years.

Although there is no actual cure for canine hip dysplasia, arthritis, or osteochondrosis (OCD), regular treatment with Winston’s Joint System will give immediate and long-term relief without drugs.

Winston’s is a combination of three, totally-natural whole food supplements developed by a Naturopathic Doctor for his own dog. There are no side-effects because it’s just good whole food. In addition, there are no dosage problems because the dog’s body uses only what it needs.

Although canine hip dysplasia (CHD) may remain unseen in some dogs, early detection is critical. The first step to determining whether a Great Dane has hip dysplasia is through a careful physical examination by a veterinarian who will observe the dog as it sits, stands, and walks. This is the first measure to check for characteristic signs of hip dysplasia such as a side-to-side swinging gait, lameness, and arched back which is caused by shifting weight forward, or the presence of overdeveloped front-leg and shoulder muscles.

X-rays are the easiest way to diagnose hip dysplasia in a dog. A vet will evaluate the joints and take into consideration any symptoms like those listed above because sometimes an x-ray won’t reveal the full extent of the dog’s pain. The vet will also consider the dog’s movements and any evidence of lameness before making a diagnosis.

The veterinarian will move the dog’s hip joint to assess its range of motion and check for pain with the joint extended. The vet will also listen for the “click” of the hip popping out of joint and for any grating sound of bone on bone that indicates cartilage loss.

A Great Dane is a wonderful, proud animal and deserves the love and attention of a caring owner. When hip dysplasia, arthritis, or OCD strikes, the first thing to do is schedule a visit to your vet. If surgery is not recommended then you should start your dog on a regimen of Winston’s Joint System.

Hip Dysplasia in Labradors

Tuesday, December 14th, 2010


Hip dysplasia in Labradors is a genetic disease that can cause crippling, lameness and severe arthritic pain in a dog’s joints. For Labradors that are genetically prone to hip dysplasia, symptoms can occur in puppies that are just a few months old or they can strike later in a dog’s life.

There are a number of causative factors that determine whether a dog will develop hip dysplasia. The most important being the genetic make-up of the dog (whether its parents and grand-parents had hip dysplasia), the type of diet being fed the dog, and obesity, which puts additional strain and weight on hip joints that become weak from hip dysplasia, arthritis, or osteochondrosis (OCD).

It is not possible to predict when or even if hip dysplasia will occur in a dog, however, there are some easily noticeable symptoms of hip dysplasia which include moving more slowly, difficulty in getting up or lying down, reluctance to walk, jump or play, refusing to use stairs or get into the car, muscle atrophy, limping, yelping when touched, changes in appetite, and personality changes.

Labradors who develop hip dysplasia, arthritis or OCD, suffer from pain and stiffness in their joints which greatly diminishes their ability to live a quality life and remain active.

When a Lab is diagnosed with hip dysplasia and the choices for treatment seem limited to expensive surgery or questionable drugs, I recommend you begin treating your dog with Winston’s Joint System, an all-natural formula developed by a Naturopathic Doctor to heal his own beloved dog. This proven formula has been giving relief from pain and stiffness to all breeds and ages of dogs for more than 20 years.

All Labradors have different temperaments, different pain thresholds and different bodies. Some may be able to cope with the pain and discomfort for a long time before showing any signs of hip dysplasia or arthritis.

X-rays are the easiest way to diagnose hip dysplasia in a dog. A vet will evaluate the joints and take into consideration any symptoms like those listed above because sometimes an x-ray won’t reveal the full extent of the dog’s pain. The vet will also consider the dog’s movements and any evidence of lameness before making a diagnosis.

Although there is no actual cure for canine hip dysplasia, arthritis, or osteochondrosis (OCD), regular treatment with Winston’s Joint System will give immediate and long-term relief without drugs.

Winston’s is a combination of three, totally-natural whole food supplements developed by a Naturopathic Doctor for his own dog. There are no side-effects because it’s just good whole food. In addition, there are no dosage problems because the dog’s body uses only what it needs.

Exercise and weight control are also vitally important. A dog’s weight, together with exercise, helps in the development of cartilage growth and aids in reducing pain and discomfort.

Surgery is normally only considered in cases of Labrador hip dysplasia if all other treatments have failed to improve the dog’s condition. This procedure is expensive and the recovery time for a dog can be considerably lengthened if the post-surgical dog is not cared for properly. The desired result of any surgical procedure is to provide an acceptable quality of life for the Lab, so surgery should be considered only if a vet is reasonably certain of success.

The most successful joint modification surgery involves reshaping or replacing the femur, or realigning the hip socket. This surgery is only recommended for younger dogs. Older and heavier dogs who suffer from hip dysplasia are generally not considered good candidates for the surgery. There is a fairly high incidence of mortality for older dogs undergoing this procedure and that is something you need to discuss frankly with your vet if surgery is recommended.

You want your beautiful Lab to be with you as long as possible so please watch for any signs or symptoms of hip dysplasia or arthritis, and begin early treatment of your pet with Winston’s Joint System.

Hip Dysplasia in Golden Retrievers

Tuesday, December 7th, 2010


Hip dysplasia in Golden Retrievers is a genetic disorder, an inherited instability of the dog’s joints which is common in the breed.

The Golden Retriever was first developed in Scotland, the original breeding being a cross between a male yellow-colored Retriever with a Tweed Water Spaniel female dog.

Some variations exist between the British type Golden Retrievers prevalent throughout Europe and Australia, and those of American lines, and these differences are reflected in the breed standard. The muzzle of the British type of dog is wider and shorter, and its forehead is blockier. It has shorter legs, with a slightly deeper chest, and a shorter tail. Its features make it generally heavier than the American Retriever. The eyes of the European type are noted for their roundness and darkness as contrasted with the triangular or slanted composition of American Golden Retrievers.

Retriever’s coat colors range from a light golden color to dark golden. The Golden’s coat can also be mahogany colored, which is referred to as “redhead”. As a Golden grows older, its coat can become darker or lighter, along with a noticeable whitening of the fur on and around the muzzle. A puppy’s color is usually much lighter than its adult coat.

Golden Retrievers shed moderately to heavily, shedding year round, especially in the spring and early summer. The coat and undercoat are dense and waterproof, and may be straight or moderately wavy.

The temperament of the Golden Retriever is described as kindly, friendly and confident. They are equally friendly with both strangers and those familiar to them. Their trusting, gentle disposition makes them a poor guard dog. Unprovoked aggression or hostility towards people, dogs or other animals is not in keeping with the character of the breed. The typical Golden Retriever is calm and naturally intelligent, with an exceptional eagerness to please.

Golden Retrievers are also noted for their intelligence, ranking fourth after the Border Collie, Poodle, and German Shepherd. Goldens are one of the brightest dogs ranked by obedience command trainability. These dogs are also renowned for their patience with children.

The average life span for a Golden Retriever is 11 to 11½ years.

Golden Retrievers are susceptible to genetic disorders like hip and elbow dysplasia which is common in the breed. Hip dysplasia is an inherited instability of the dog’s joints. This instability can be compounded by environmental factors such as injury to the joint and by dietary factors such as pushing rapid growth in puppies.

It is not possible to predict when or even if hip dysplasia will occur in a Golden. However, there are some easily noticeable symptoms of hip dysplasia which include moving more slowly, difficulty in getting up or lying down, reluctance to walk, jump or play, refusing to use stairs or get into the car, muscle atrophy, limping, yelping when touched, changes in appetite, and personality changes.

X-rays are the easiest way to diagnose hip dysplasia in a Golden Retriever. A vet will evaluate the joints and take into consideration any symptoms like those listed above because sometimes an x-ray won’t reveal the full extent of the dog’s pain. The vet will also consider the dog’s movements and any evidence of lameness before making a diagnosis.

When a Golden is diagnosed with hip dysplasia and the choices for treatment seem limited to expensive surgery or questionable drugs, many holistic vets recommend you begin treating your dog with Winston’s Joint System, an all-natural formula developed by a Naturopathic Doctor to heal his own beloved dog. This proven formula has been giving relief from pain and stiffness to all breeds and ages of dogs for more than 20 years.

Although there is no actual cure for canine hip dysplasia, arthritis, or osteochondrosis (OCD), regular treatment with Winston’s Joint System will give immediate and long-term relief without drugs.

Winston’s is a combination of three, totally-natural whole food supplements developed by a Naturopathic Doctor for his own dog. There are no side-effects because it’s just good whole food. In addition, there are no dosage problems because the dog’s body uses only what it needs.

Surgery is normally only considered in cases of hip dysplasia if all other treatments have failed to improve the dog’s condition. This procedure is expensive and the recovery time for a dog can be considerably lengthened if the post-surgical dog is not cared for properly. The desired result of any surgical procedure is to provide an acceptable quality of life for the dog, so surgery should be considered only if a vet is reasonably certain of success.

The best way to treat hip dysplasia is of course to prevent it. Before buying a puppy, be sure it has been certified free of hip dysplasia. Certified-free parents are not guaranteed to have dysplasia-free pups.

You want your beautiful Golden to be with you as long as possible so be alert to any signs or symptoms of hip dysplasia or arthritis, and begin early treatment of your pet with Winston’s Joint System.

Hip Dysplasia in Large and Older Dogs

Tuesday, November 30th, 2010


Hip dysplasia in large and older dogs is medically referred to as Canine Hip Dysplasia (CHD) and is a common disease in large breeds and older dogs. But it can also affect dogs of any age and breed, although it’s rarer in small breeds.

Hip dysplasia is genetically transmitted from a dog’s parents or grandparents, but because multiple genes are involved, scientists have not been able to determine the pattern of inheritance. Adding to the problem of causation is the complicated interplay between heredity and the environment. Environmental factors can also have an influence on whether or not a particular dog or breed of dog will eventually develop hip dysplasia. Canine hip dysplasia is the most common orthopedic problem in dogs and is caused by a loose hipbone to thighbone connection leading to hind joint pain and lameness ranging from mild to severely crippling.

Hip dysplasia is a very debilitating disease and painful for the poor dog who has to suffer with it.

Canine hip dysplasia most often affects these breeds:
Golden Retrievers
Labrador Retrievers
German Shepherds
Great Danes
Pit Bulls
Mastiffs
Doberman Pinschers
Saint Bernards

Early symptoms of hip dysplasia include:
Changes in gait, including a “bunny hop” walk
Sitting rather than standing
Difficulty getting up
Crying or yelping when an affected joint is moved or touched
Signs of pain during and after activity
Pain in the rear legs and hips, especially in the mornings
Trouble climbing stairs or running
Avoiding normal activities like a morning or evening walk

These symptoms of hip dysplasia may seem like gradual changes that are common to an aging dog, but by noticing these physical signs in the early stages, an owner can prevent further pain and suffering for their dog and improve the dog’s mobility and activity levels before the disease has developed to the point that surgery or powerful medications are required.

Dogs who do suffer with joint diseases such as arthritis, osteochondrosis (OCD), hip dysplasia and other degenerative joint problems can experience immediate and long-term relief with a regimen of Winston’s Joint System.

Winston’s Joint System is a combination of three, totally-natural whole food supplements developed by a Naturopathic Doctor for his own dog. There are no drugs in Winston’s and there are no side-effects because it’s just good whole food. And there are no dosage problems because the dog’s body uses only what it needs.

Winston’s provides many of the raw materials essential for the synthesis of the joint-lubricating synovial fluid as well as the repair of articular cartilage and connective tissue. Within the first 30 days of treatment, dogs on Winston’s Joint System show noticeable and often remarkable improvement.

Hip dysplasia is a genetic disease that often can’t be prevented. It is a progressively degenerative disease, so any measure of prevention you can take at an early stage will improve the quality of your dog’s life for years. If you own a large breed dog like one of those listed above, or your dog is a senior dog showing signs of joint disease, you owe it to your faithful companion to start him on Winston’s Joint System as soon as possible.

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