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The #1 source for immediate, long-term relief for dogs suffering from degenerative diseases like hip dysplasia, OCD and arthritis.

We are specialists in the treatment of canine joint disease and its accompanying pain.

Let us help put an end to your dog’s suffering, joint stiffness, pain, immobility, and poor quality of life. Our proven products will help you easily accomplish this without the use of drugs or invasive surgery.

Joint Issues

  • Hip Dysplasia
  • Arthritis
  • Osteochondritis (OCD)
  • Stiffness/Inflammation
  • Ligament Tears
  • Growing Pains
  • Mobility Problems
  • Joint Pain
  • Back/Spinal Problems
  • Hypertrophic Osteodystrophy (HOD)

Symptoms

Is your pet becoming less active, less playful, or desiring shorter walks? The following symptoms could be early signs of OCD, Arthritis or Hip Dysplasia.

  • Moving more slowly
  • Difficulty getting up
  • Weight shift to another leg
  • Personality change
  • Reluctant to walk, jump or play
  • Refuses using stairs or the car
  • Change in appetite
  • Change in behavior
  • Muscle atrophy
  • Lagging behind
  • Yelping when touched
  • Limping
We Can Help!
 

Archive for the ‘Dog Pain | Discover Ways To Minimize Your Dogs Pain’ Category

Dogs Who Develop Hip Dysplasia

Monday, March 2nd, 2015


Hip dysplasia is a genetic disease that primarily affects large and giant breeds of dogs but can also affect medium-sized breeds, and some small breeds. It is primarily a disease of purebreds, although it can also occur in mixed breeds.

Dogs who develop hip dysplasia suffer from an abnormal joint structure and a laxity of the muscles, connective tissue, and ligaments that would normally support the dog’s hip joints. As the disease progresses, the articular surfaces of the two bones lose contact with each other. This separation of the two bones within the joint causes a drastic change in the size and shape of the articular surfaces.

Most dogs who develop hip dysplasia are born with normal hips, but due to their genetic make-up the soft tissues surrounding the joint develop abnormally. This leads to the symptoms associated with hip dysplasia. The disease may affect both hips, or only the right or left hip.

The symptoms of hip dysplasia cause afflicted dogs to walk or run with an altered gait, similar to a bunny-hop. They begin to resist any movement that requires full extension or flexion of the rear legs. They will experience stiffness and pain in their rear legs after exercising and on first rising in the morning. Climbing stairs becomes difficult if not impossible. Some dogs will limp and are less willing to participate in normal daily activities, including walks they formerly enjoyed.

Because hip dysplasia is primarily an inherited condition, there are no products that can prevent its development. Through proper diet, exercise, and a supplement such as Winston’s Joint System, you can slow, and sometimes halt, the progression of these degenerative joint diseases while providing your dog with relief from its pain. Winston’s provides many of the raw materials essential for the synthesis of the joint-lubricating synovial fluid as well as the repair of articular cartilage and connective tissue.

    Dogs who are prone to develop hip dysplasia include the following:

Afghan Hound, Airedale Terrier, Akita, Alaskan Malamute, American Eskimo Dog, American Staffordshire Terrier, American Water Spaniel, Anatolian Shepherd, Australian Cattle Dog, Basset Hound, Beagle, Belgian Malinois, Belgian Sheepdog, Bernese Mountain Dog, Bichon Frise, Black and Tan Coonhound, Black Russian Terrier, Bloodhound, Border Collie, Border Terrier, Bouvier des Flandres, Boxer, Brussels Griffon, Bulldog, Bullmastiff, Cardigan Welsh Corgi, Chesapeake Bay Retriever, Chinese Shar-Pei, Chow-Chow, Collie, Curly-Coated Retriever, Dalmatian, Doberman Pinscher, English Cocker Spaniel, English Foxhound, English Setter, English Springer Spaniel, French Bulldog, German Shepherd, German Shorthaired Pointer, German Wirehaired Pointer, Giant Schnauzer, Golden Retriever, Great Dane, Great Pyrenees, Greater Swiss Mountain Dog, Irish Setter, Irish Water Spaniel, Irish Wolfhound, Keeshond, Labrador Retriever, Lhasa Apso, Mastiff, Newfoundland, Norwegian Elkhound, Old English Sheepdog, Pembroke Welsh Corgi, Pointer, Portuguese Water Dog, Pug, Rhodesian Ridgeback, Rottweiler, Saint Bernard, Samoyed, Shetland Sheepdog, Shiba Inu, Shih Tzu, Siberian Husky, Staffordshire Bull Terrier, Standard Schnauzer, Weimaraner, and Welsh Springer Spaniel.

This is by no means a complete list of dogs who can develop hip dysplasia. It is important you understand that just because your dog’s breed is on this list does NOT mean it will develop hip dysplasia at some point in its life.

Learn How To Improve Your Dogs Health That Suffers From Hip Dysplasia

How To Calculate Your Dog’s Age

Monday, February 2nd, 2015


Here’s an easy way to calculate your dog’s age in human years. Dogs age faster than people do, but the conventional wisdom that one dog year equals seven human years is an oversimplified method of calculating a dog’s age. You can guess the approximate age of a dog this way but it doesn’t take into account the fact that dogs mature more quickly than children do in their initial years.

Figuring for the difference in maturation between a child and a dog, the first year of a dog’s life would be equal to about 15 human years, not seven.

A dog’s size and breed also influence the rate at which a dog ages. Smaller dogs tend to live longer than larger dogs but they generally mature more rapidly in the first few years of their life. A large dog will mature more slowly at first but is considered elderly by the age of five.

In contrast, small and toy breeds aren’t considered elderly until they reach 10 years of age. Medium-sized breeds fall between small breeds and large breeds in lifespan.

* A small dog weighs 20 pounds or less
* A medium dog weighs 21 to 50 pounds
* A large dog weighs more than 50 pounds

Here’s How To Calculate Your Dog’s Age in Human Years:
1 Year = 15 human years
2 Years = 24 human years
3 Years = 28 human years
4 Years = 32 human years
5 Years = 36 human years

At 6 years of age the size of a dog begins to determine its age in human years:

6 Years = 40 human years for small breeds; 42 for medium size breeds; 45 for large breeds
7 Years = 44 human years for small breeds; 47 for medium size breeds; 50 for large breeds
8 Years = 48 human years for small breeds; 51 for medium size breeds; 55 for large breeds
9 Years = 52 human years for small breeds; 56 for medium size breeds; 61 for large breeds
10 Years = 56 human years for small breeds; 60 for medium size breeds; 66 for large breeds
11 Years = 60 human years for small breeds; 65 for medium size breeds; 72 for large breeds
12 Years = 64 human years for small breeds; 69 for medium size breeds; 77 for large breeds
13 Years = 68 human years for small breeds; 74 for medium size breeds; 82 for large breeds
14 Years = 72 human years for small breeds; 78 for medium size breeds; 88 for large breeds
15 Years = 76 human years for small breeds; 83 for medium size breeds; 93 for large breeds
16 Years = 80 human years for small breeds; 87 for medium size breeds; 120 for large breeds

If you’ve adopted a puppy or dog from a shelter but the dog’s history is unknown, it’s still possible to estimate how old the dog is. Checking a dog’s teeth can give you a rough indication of its age. The degree of tooth growth helps determine how old a puppy is, and the degree of wear and tartar buildup helps estimate the age of an adult dog.

Here are some general guidelines:
* By 8 weeks: All baby teeth are in
* By 7 months: All permanent teeth are in and are white and clean
* By 1-2 years: Teeth are duller and the back teeth may have some yellowing
* By 3-5 years: All teeth may have tartar build-up and some tooth wear
* By 5-10 years: Teeth show more wear and signs of disease
* By 10-15 years: Teeth are worn, and heavy tartar build-up is likely. Some teeth may be missing.

In older dogs, signs of aging may show up in a variety of ways, including a cloudy appearance in the eyes, graying hair around the muzzle, face, head and body, a lack of elasticity in the skin, and possible stiffness of the joints.

If you’re still not sure of its age and really want to know if your dog’s breed is susceptible to any genetic diseases like hip dysplasia or arthritis, your vet can also estimate your dog’s age based on a complete physical exam or tests by checking its bones, joints, muscles, and internal organs.

Hopefully this information will assist you in figuring out how to calculate your dog’s age.

Symptoms of Diabetes in Dogs

Monday, January 19th, 2015


Diabetes in dogs is a condition where the pancreas does not produce sufficient amounts of insulin to effectively process the foods a dog eats. Because the food isn’t processed appropriately, it is unable to pass into the cells where it can be utilized, causing an excess of sugars to be passed into the bloodstream.

Common symptoms of diabetes in dogs are extreme thirst, excessive urination, ravenous hunger and weight loss. As the disease progresses, almost every system in the dog’s body can be impacted. If you suspect your dog may have diabetes, it is important to see a veterinarian for testing, diagnosis and the beginning of treatment.

Even though your dog may be drinking large amounts of water, its body is using more water than normal in order to flush its systems in an attempt to bring the blood sugar to a normal level.

Weight loss is caused by the body’s inability to take in adequate nutrients. The body begins to consume itself producing ketoacidosis, a condition that can become deadly if not treated.

Your dog may also exhibit symptoms of lethargy which is caused by its elevated blood sugar. The body and muscles are not able to operate efficiently under these conditions so it is easier for the dog to just lie around your house.

Because the symptoms of diabetes in dogs could also be an indication of other diseases, your veterinarian will conduct a thorough examination to determine if any of your dog’s systems such as heart, eyes or kidneys have been damaged.

Additional tests may be run on the blood and urine samples once the diagnosis of diabetes has been confirmed. The urine may be tested for protein presence. This indicates whether the diabetes has begun to break down muscle tissue in order to provide nutrients for your dog’s body. Your veterinarian may also want to conduct a hemoglobin A1c test on the blood to help him determine how long your dog’s blood sugars have been elevated. The blood may also be tested to determine if your dog’s kidney function has been impacted and how much function is left.

Once a dog is diagnosed with diabetes, the vet will prescribe insulin injections. It may take a few weeks to determine the appropriate dosage, but then the dog should be able to live a relatively normal life except for the addition of daily injections and possibly testing of blood sugar. Diabetes can be a juggling act as diet, medication and exercise must all be part of the equation in caring for a diabetic dog.

A low protein dog food is often recommended for diabetic dogs in order to minimize the strain on the kidneys and to protect their kidney function. Regular exercise is also recommended for a diabetic dog in order to help maintain control of the diabetes.

Treating a diabetic dog involves a combination of medication, food and exercise. Finding an appropriate balance is key to controlling its diabetes and preventing further complications.

Why Do Dogs Chew Their Paws?

Monday, December 8th, 2014


Dogs enjoy chewing on lots of things, including their own paws at times. But why do dogs chew their paws?

If a dog has an emotional problem like separation anxiety, it may chew on its paws. Stress is also one of the major causes of why dogs chew their paws and this stress can be triggered by a past event or a continuing irritant in a dog’s environment.

Some of the most common reasons for a dog to be stressed are listed below:
(1) A new person arrives in the family, like a newborn baby, and the dog is frequently ignored;
(2) A new pet is brought into the household;
(3) Abusive behavior by the current dog owner or by a previous owner;
(4) Separation from its owner or abandonment (this can result in separation anxiety and cause a dog to chew on its paws and skin);
(5) A serious lack of affection from the dog’s owners.

There are other factors that can trigger severe stress in a dog and cause it to chew on its paws; but whatever the cause, it’s important to identify it and work to change that motivation as quickly as possible. Once the dog feels comfortable and safe, the chewing on its paws should end.

It’s also possible and quite likely, that dogs who are bored or dogs with too much energy will find a way to occupy their time, and that usually results in destructive behavior, of which chewing their paws is just one example. You can help change this unwanted behavior by making sure your dog gets plenty of exercise and attention.

Chewing the paws can also be a reaction to a skin infection caused by a virus, bacteria or fungi. The dog will try to soothe the itching by licking and chewing at its skin. A vet can prescribe antibiotics to eliminate the skin infection and once the dog has healthy skin again it will usually stop chewing its paws.

An allergic reaction also causes dogs to chew their paws. These allergies could be caused by food or something the dog has inhaled. Antihistamines or steroid creams will ease the itchiness, but you’ll need to determine what the dog is allergic to and eliminate the dog’s access to that product or thing causing the adverse reaction.

Pet Emergencies Needing a Vet

Monday, November 24th, 2014


An emergency trip to the veterinarian can be very stressful and result in a large bill, and there are some pet emergencies that absolutely require an immediate visit to the vet.

Deciding if your dog’s health problem is so serious that it needs immediate vet care can be a difficult decision that means the difference between spending thousands of dollars versus hundreds of dollars if you can schedule an appointment during regular hospital hours. However, it can also mean the difference between life and death for your dog.

    These are symptoms of problems that require immediate emergency veterinary care:

The most common health problems requiring an emergency visit to the pet hospital are open wounds, serious burns, and broken bones. If your dog has been hit by a car, has been in a fight with another animal, or has fallen victim to some other accident, take it to the emergency vet immediately.

White, blue or pale gums are signs of low blood pressure, poor circulation, anemia, internal bleeding, or shock. These symptoms are a clear sign that something is seriously wrong with your dog.

If you think your dog has ingested a toxic item like chocolates, pesticides, onions, or alcohol, take it to the emergency vet immediately.

If your dog seems lethargic you should take its body temperature. Normal body temperature for dogs ranges between 101 and 102 degrees. If your dog’s temperature is noticeably outside these ranges you need to seek immediate medical attention.

Abnormal and loud cries may indicate your dog is suffering from severe pain even if there are no external symptoms.

Irregular and excessive coughing can be a sign of an infection or possible problems with the trachea, or even the dog’s heart, and will require immediate attention.

A bloated abdomen may indicate serious abdominal trouble and restricted blood flow and may be accompanied by unusual vomiting. If left untreated, this condition can lead to death.

If your dog has heavy or labored breathing it could be attributed to overheating or a respiratory problem, but also could be caused by stress or obesity.

Another serious pet emergency needing a vet visit, is a seizure or unconsciousness. If this happens to your dog, take it to the pet hospital immediately.

To save yourself a needless and costly emergency trip to the vet, call the vet first and describe your dog’s symptoms before going to the pet hospital. The vet may recommend a regular scheduled appointment if he or she doesn’t think the dog’s problem is too serious.

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