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The #1 source for immediate, long-term relief for dogs suffering from degenerative diseases like hip dysplasia, OCD and arthritis.

We are specialists in the treatment of canine joint disease and its accompanying pain.

Let us help put an end to your dog’s suffering, joint stiffness, pain, immobility, and poor quality of life. Our proven products will help you easily accomplish this without the use of drugs or invasive surgery.

Joint Issues

  • Hip Dysplasia
  • Arthritis
  • Osteochondritis (OCD)
  • Stiffness/Inflammation
  • Ligament Tears
  • Growing Pains
  • Mobility Problems
  • Joint Pain
  • Back/Spinal Problems
  • Hypertrophic Osteodystrophy (HOD)

Symptoms

Is your pet becoming less active, less playful, or desiring shorter walks? The following symptoms could be early signs of OCD, Arthritis or Hip Dysplasia.

  • Moving more slowly
  • Difficulty getting up
  • Weight shift to another leg
  • Personality change
  • Reluctant to walk, jump or play
  • Refuses using stairs or the car
  • Change in appetite
  • Change in behavior
  • Muscle atrophy
  • Lagging behind
  • Yelping when touched
  • Limping
We Can Help!
 

Posts Tagged ‘Border Collie’

Hip Dysplasia in Border Collies

Monday, October 31st, 2011


Border Collies are a breed of dog known for their very active lifestyle. Sadly, hip dysplasia in Border Collies is not a rare occurrence, and the more you know about hip dysplasia, the better you will be prepared to watch your pet for any signs of this debilitating disease.

Border Collies are loyal, easily trainable, intelligent dogs with natural energetic personalities. They require a lot of room to run around in, making them better suited to living on a farm or ranch where they can expend their surplus energy. They are not really suited for living indoors, especially in an apartment. These dogs are meant to work and play outdoors in wide-open spaces.

They form a strong bond with their owners but can be unfriendly to strangers, making them good dogs for guarding your house and property. They are not “attack dogs” but they will certainly let you know if a stranger approaches your house.

Border Collies have natural inbred herding instincts and may start “herding” small children or small pets in your household. They are hardy, high-strung dogs with a determined drive. If you’re a person who likes to play sporting games with your dog, you’ll love Border Collies.

But if you’re just looking for a calm, friendly family pet, a Border Collie probably isn’t the ideal choice. They are demanding dogs that need a lot of attention, ample outdoor exercise and a task like herding sheep, goats, or whatever animal (or person) it feels is in need of herding!

Border Collies also like receiving direction. They require firm leadership from an owner who has the time and patience to follow through with obedience lessons and training. They will dominate a weak-willed owner, so it’s very important that a Border Collie understands who’s boss around the house. Severe punishment or harsh treatment for infractions or disobedience are not recommended because they can cause negative reactions in Border Collies, whereas positive reinforcement helps them.

Border Collies are medium-sized dogs with a light frame, long hair, and athletic bodies that are strong and agile. The typical Border Collie has a slightly wide head with a tapered muzzle, half-perked ears and dark, oval eyes. The long tail sometimes raises but never curls over the back. Their coats are usually sleek and their coat colors are solid black, black and white, black and gray, or red and white.

A healthy Border Collie can live as long as 15 years. Common health problems include deafness, epilepsy, and hip dysplasia.

Hip dysplasia is a genetic disease that primarily affects large and giant breeds of dogs but can also affect medium-sized breeds and occasionally small breeds. It is primarily a disease of purebreds, although it can also occur in mixed breeds.

To understand hip dysplasia and the resulting arthritis, you need a basic understanding of how the dog’s hip joint is affected. The hip joint is comprised of a ball and socket that forms the attachment of the hind leg to the body. The ball portion is the head of the femur and the socket is located on the pelvis. In a normal hip joint the ball rotates freely within the socket. The bones are shaped to perfectly match each other with the socket surrounding the ball. To strengthen the joint, the two bones are held together by a strong ligament. The joint capsule, a strong band of connective tissue, circles the two bones to provide added stability.

This is a normal hip joint:


Hip dysplasia is linked to abnormal joint structure and a laxity of the muscles, connective tissue, and ligaments that would normally support the dog’s hip joints. As the disease progresses, the articular surfaces of the two bones lose contact with each other. This separation of the two bones within the joint causes a drastic change in the size and shape of the articular surfaces.

This is an abnormal hip joint:

Most dogs who eventually develop hip dysplasia are born with normal hips, but due to their genetic make-up the soft tissues surrounding the joint develop abnormally. This leads to the symptoms associated with hip dysplasia. The disease may affect both hips, or only the right or left hip.

Hip dysplasia in Border Collies causes afflicted dogs to walk or run with an altered gait, similar to a bunny-hop. They begin to resist any movement that requires full extension or flexion of the rear legs. They will experience stiffness and pain in their rear legs after exercising and on first rising in the morning. Climbing stairs becomes difficult if not impossible. Some dogs will limp and are less willing to participate in normal daily activities, including walks they formerly enjoyed.

It appears that the amount of calories a dog consumes, especially during its fast-growth period from three to ten months, has the biggest impact on whether or not a dog genetically prone to hip dysplasia will develop the disease.

Obesity can increase the severity of the disease in dogs that are genetically susceptible and the extra weight will intensify the degeneration of a dog’s joints and hips. Dogs who are genetically prone to hip dysplasia and also are overweight, are at a much higher risk of developing hip dysplasia and eventually osteoarthritis.

Exercise can be another risk factor. Dogs genetically susceptible to hip dysplasia may have an increased incidence of the disease if they are over-exercised at a young age. Moderate exercise like running and swimming is best for exercising young dogs.

Because hip dysplasia is primarily an inherited condition in Border Collies, there are no products that can prevent its development. Through proper diet, exercise, and a daily regimen of Winston’s Joint System, you can slow, and sometimes halt, the progression of these degenerative joint diseases while providing your dog with relief from its pain. Winston’s provides many of the raw materials essential for the synthesis of the joint-lubricating synovial fluid as well as the repair of articular cartilage and connective tissue.

There are different assumptions on how to prevent the progression of hip dysplasia in Border Collies. Poor nutrition, inadequate or improper exercise, and increased body weight may all contribute to the severity of osteoarthritis after the hip dysplasia has developed. By watching the calories your puppy or young dog consumes and preventing obesity in your dog, allowing only non-stressful types of exercise, and a daily regimen of Winston’s Joint System, are the best things you can do for your dog.

Hip Dysplasia in Rottweilers

Monday, October 17th, 2011


Rottweilers are known to be very strong and sturdy animals, but unfortunately, hip dysplasia in Rottweilers is a fairly common problem.

Rottweilers are noted for being self-confident and intelligent, and when they are properly trained and socialized, they become loving, devoted companions.

Rottweilers are extremely energetic dogs and love to play catch, keep pace alongside you when out for a run, or go for a long hike in the woods or mountains. They crave attention and companionship from their owners and when they don’t receive it they tend to get bored and destructive. A neglected or mistreated Rottweiler can quickly destroy your possessions.

A contented and well trained Rottweiler makes a devoted friend to children and an extremely efficient watchdog. They make good companions because they are always eager to please.

Rottweilers are huge dogs with challenging temperaments. They appreciate a confident owner who can show them who’s boss. They occasionally like to test authority, so you need to stay current with their training and obedience commands.

Rottweilers appreciate stimulating tasks and activities and enjoy being kept busy with obedience games. Always keep them on a leash in public because they can be somewhat confrontational with other dogs.

They are believed to have descended from the sturdy and muscular Mastiff-like dogs of ancient Rome. Their name comes from the German cattle town of Rottweil, where the dogs managed herds of cattle for hundreds of years. In the early 1900’s they became popular police dogs and today they are prized as both working dogs and beloved companions.

Rottweilers have medium-sized, powerful builds and dense, straight glossy coats. They have broad heads with rounded skulls and straight, well-developed muzzles. Their dark, almond-shaped eyes have a friendly look, and their triangular ears hang forward. They have strong necks, firm backs and often have their tails docked. Their coats are usually black with rusty patches.

A healthy Rottweiler can live as long as 12 years. Common health issues include eye problems and hip dysplasia.

Hip dysplasia in Rottweilers is a genetic disease that primarily affects large and giant breeds of dogs but can also affect medium-sized breeds and occasionally small breeds. It is primarily a disease of purebreds, although it can also occur in mixed breeds.

To understand hip dysplasia and the resulting arthritis, you need a basic understanding of how the dog’s hip joint is affected. The hip joint is comprised of a ball and socket that forms the attachment of the hind leg to the body. The ball portion is the head of the femur and the socket is located on the pelvis. In a normal hip joint the ball rotates freely within the socket. The bones are shaped to perfectly match each other with the socket surrounding the ball. To strengthen the joint, the two bones are held together by a strong ligament. The joint capsule, a strong band of connective tissue, circles the two bones to provide added stability.

A normal hip joint:

Hip dysplasia is linked to abnormal joint structure and a laxity of the muscles, connective tissue, and ligaments that would normally support the dog’s hip joints. As the disease progresses, the articular surfaces of the two bones lose contact with each other. This separation of the two bones within the joint causes a drastic change in the size and shape of the articular surfaces.

A diseased hip joint:

Most dogs who eventually develop hip dysplasia are born with normal hips, but due to their genetic make-up the soft tissues surrounding the joint develop abnormally. This leads to the symptoms associated with hip dysplasia. The disease may affect both hips, or only the right or left hip.

The symptoms of hip dysplasia cause afflicted dogs to walk or run with an altered gait, similar to a bunny-hop. They begin to resist any movement that requires full extension or flexion of the rear legs. They will experience stiffness and pain in their rear legs after exercising and on first rising in the morning. Climbing stairs becomes difficult if not impossible. Some dogs will limp and are less willing to participate in normal daily activities, including walks they formerly enjoyed.

It appears that the amount of calories a dog consumes, especially during its fast-growth period from three to ten months, has the biggest impact on whether or not a dog genetically prone to hip dysplasia will develop the disease.

Obesity can increase the severity of the disease in dogs that are genetically susceptible and the extra weight will intensify the degeneration of a dog’s joints and hips. Dogs who are genetically prone to hip dysplasia and also are overweight, are at a much higher risk of developing hip dysplasia and eventually osteoarthritis.

Exercise can be another risk factor. Dogs genetically susceptible to hip dysplasia may have an increased incidence of the disease if they are over-exercised at a young age. Moderate exercise like running and swimming is best for exercising young dogs.

Because hip dysplasia is primarily an inherited condition, there are no products that can prevent its development. Through proper diet, exercise, and a daily regimen of Winston’s Joint System, you can slow, and sometimes halt, the progression of these degenerative joint diseases while providing your dog with relief from its pain. Winston’s provides many of the raw materials essential for the synthesis of the joint-lubricating synovial fluid as well as the repair of articular cartilage and connective tissue.

There are different assumptions on how to prevent the progression of hip dysplasia in Rottweilers. Poor nutrition, inadequate or improper exercise, and increased body weight may all contribute to the severity of osteoarthritis after the hip dysplasia has developed. By watching the calories your puppy or young dog consumes and preventing obesity in your dog, allowing only non-stressful types of exercise, and a daily regimen of Winston’s Joint System, are the best things you can do for your dog.

Exercise and Your Dog

Monday, August 15th, 2011


To stay healthy and fit and prevent dog pain, your pet needs regular exercise. Exercise is one of your dog’s basic needs and is as important to its health as proper nutrition.

It may surprise you to know that most breeds of dogs require from one to two hours of daily exercise to stay healthy. Your dog may need more or less, depending on its age and breed. An older Yorkie, for example, may just want to loaf on your sofa, while a young adult Border Collie might require four hours of exercise every day and still want more.

How much exercise will my dog really need?

How much exercise is enough depends on your dog’s age, breed, and its health. A 10-month old Irish Terrier puppy is going to need more than a five-year old Whippet. Some hound breeds need short bursts of exercise, while guard dogs don’t need as much overall exercise as sporting breeds who like to hunt all day. Even within a breed, the need varies by animal. An energetic eight-year-old Golden Retriever could easily need more exercise than a calm three-year old Golden. Older dogs still need to go for walks too – they just need shorter walks than they were used to when they were younger.

The costs of not giving your dog enough exercise range from overweight and obesity, to the risk of diabetes, respiratory disease, and heart disease. Obesity is more than a health problem; it can stress a dog’s joints, ligaments, and tendons. Older dogs often have a hard enough time getting up without the added problem of lifting excess pounds. Lack of exercise substantially increases orthopedic problems such as hip dysplasia and arthritis.

If your senior dog suffers from hip dysplasia, arthritis, or other degenerative joint diseases, the best product you can buy to help him is Winston’s Joint System. Winston’s is an all-natural formula developed by a Naturopathic Doctor to heal his own beloved dog who suffered from debilitating joint problems. For more than 20 years, Winston’s proven formula has been giving relief from pain and stiffness to all breeds and ages of dogs.

When considering exercise for your dog, don’t fool yourself that a leisurely walk around the block is enough. Most dogs need 30 to 60 minutes of exercise a day. Here are some general rules of thumb:

* Active breeds need a minimum of 30 minutes of hard aerobic exercise daily;
* Not all small breeds get enough exercise inside the house and need outside exercise too;
* It’s not safe to take your dog out in extremely hot or cold weather. Exercise indoors on these days.

No two dogs are the same, so determining your dog’s exercise needs takes some trial and error. When you are unsure, start by giving your dog as much exercise as it wants, being careful not to overdo it. Watch closely for signs of exhaustion such as heavy panting, wheezing, lameness in the legs, and frequent slowing or stopping to lie down during the exercise period. Avoid outdoor exercise on very hot days, and be sure to provide fresh, cool water at all times.

How can you determine what kind of exercise is best for your dog?

There are many activities you can do with your dog while exercising your own body at the same time. Walking, running or hiking with your dog is great exercise for both of you and frees your mind to focus on the beauty that surrounds you.

Some activities provide more exercise for your dog than for you, but are still a fun way to bond with your pet. Playing fetch with a ball or frisbee is loads of fun for many dogs.

If you’re lucky enough to live within driving distance of a dog park, your dog will find companionship among other visitors to the park, and you have the added benefit of engaging in conversation with other dog owners and sharing important information about your pets. Dog parks are popular places for off-leash exercise and romping with other dogs, which is exactly what most dogs need. However, not all dogs get along with others. If your dog doesn’t like other dogs, a dog park is definitely not the place to go for exercise.

As humans, we usually think of exercise only as a health issue, but it has important day-to-day effects on a dog’s behavior as well. Dogs, especially puppies and young dogs, have a lot of energy, and if they don’t have an opportunity to burn off that energy, the result will often be destructive behavior. If your dog is digging holes in your yard or you’re having to replace pillows or clothing your dog has shredded, it’s a pretty clear sign that your dog is probably not getting enough exercise.

These behavior issues often cause many people to rid themselves of their dogs, even though the bad behavior is preventable. We have all seen newspaper ads and signs tacked to telephone posts with the message “Free dog to a good home”. These are usually placed by people whose dogs need the exercise they’re not getting. Unfortunately, some people don’t consider exercise when selecting a breed of dog as a pet, and end up choosing a dog that needs more exercise than the new owner has time to provide.

Before choosing a pet dog for yourself or your family, read as much as you can about the breed or breeds you are considering and how much and how often they need to be exercised to maintain optimum health.

Hip Dysplasia in Golden Retrievers

Tuesday, December 7th, 2010


Hip dysplasia in Golden Retrievers is a genetic disorder, an inherited instability of the dog’s joints which is common in the breed.

The Golden Retriever was first developed in Scotland, the original breeding being a cross between a male yellow-colored Retriever with a Tweed Water Spaniel female dog.

Some variations exist between the British type Golden Retrievers prevalent throughout Europe and Australia, and those of American lines, and these differences are reflected in the breed standard. The muzzle of the British type of dog is wider and shorter, and its forehead is blockier. It has shorter legs, with a slightly deeper chest, and a shorter tail. Its features make it generally heavier than the American Retriever. The eyes of the European type are noted for their roundness and darkness as contrasted with the triangular or slanted composition of American Golden Retrievers.

Retriever’s coat colors range from a light golden color to dark golden. The Golden’s coat can also be mahogany colored, which is referred to as “redhead”. As a Golden grows older, its coat can become darker or lighter, along with a noticeable whitening of the fur on and around the muzzle. A puppy’s color is usually much lighter than its adult coat.

Golden Retrievers shed moderately to heavily, shedding year round, especially in the spring and early summer. The coat and undercoat are dense and waterproof, and may be straight or moderately wavy.

The temperament of the Golden Retriever is described as kindly, friendly and confident. They are equally friendly with both strangers and those familiar to them. Their trusting, gentle disposition makes them a poor guard dog. Unprovoked aggression or hostility towards people, dogs or other animals is not in keeping with the character of the breed. The typical Golden Retriever is calm and naturally intelligent, with an exceptional eagerness to please.

Golden Retrievers are also noted for their intelligence, ranking fourth after the Border Collie, Poodle, and German Shepherd. Goldens are one of the brightest dogs ranked by obedience command trainability. These dogs are also renowned for their patience with children.

The average life span for a Golden Retriever is 11 to 11½ years.

Golden Retrievers are susceptible to genetic disorders like hip and elbow dysplasia which is common in the breed. Hip dysplasia is an inherited instability of the dog’s joints. This instability can be compounded by environmental factors such as injury to the joint and by dietary factors such as pushing rapid growth in puppies.

It is not possible to predict when or even if hip dysplasia will occur in a Golden. However, there are some easily noticeable symptoms of hip dysplasia which include moving more slowly, difficulty in getting up or lying down, reluctance to walk, jump or play, refusing to use stairs or get into the car, muscle atrophy, limping, yelping when touched, changes in appetite, and personality changes.

X-rays are the easiest way to diagnose hip dysplasia in a Golden Retriever. A vet will evaluate the joints and take into consideration any symptoms like those listed above because sometimes an x-ray won’t reveal the full extent of the dog’s pain. The vet will also consider the dog’s movements and any evidence of lameness before making a diagnosis.

When a Golden is diagnosed with hip dysplasia and the choices for treatment seem limited to expensive surgery or questionable drugs, many holistic vets recommend you begin treating your dog with Winston’s Joint System, an all-natural formula developed by a Naturopathic Doctor to heal his own beloved dog. This proven formula has been giving relief from pain and stiffness to all breeds and ages of dogs for more than 20 years.

Although there is no actual cure for canine hip dysplasia, arthritis, or osteochondrosis (OCD), regular treatment with Winston’s Joint System will give immediate and long-term relief without drugs.

Winston’s is a combination of three, totally-natural whole food supplements developed by a Naturopathic Doctor for his own dog. There are no side-effects because it’s just good whole food. In addition, there are no dosage problems because the dog’s body uses only what it needs.

Surgery is normally only considered in cases of hip dysplasia if all other treatments have failed to improve the dog’s condition. This procedure is expensive and the recovery time for a dog can be considerably lengthened if the post-surgical dog is not cared for properly. The desired result of any surgical procedure is to provide an acceptable quality of life for the dog, so surgery should be considered only if a vet is reasonably certain of success.

The best way to treat hip dysplasia is of course to prevent it. Before buying a puppy, be sure it has been certified free of hip dysplasia. Certified-free parents are not guaranteed to have dysplasia-free pups.

You want your beautiful Golden to be with you as long as possible so be alert to any signs or symptoms of hip dysplasia or arthritis, and begin early treatment of your pet with Winston’s Joint System.

Do Dogs Go To Heaven?

Friday, November 5th, 2010


Many people who have lost a beloved pet often wonder if dogs go to Heaven? We believe they do, whether they behaved badly or were wonderful, loving dogs during their entire lives. The bond between an owner and his dog can never be broken as you’ll see in the story that follows.

An old man and his pet dog were walking down a dusty, winding road lined with fences bordering the sides. About a mile into their walk they came upon a white painted wooden picket gate which led into a peaceful meadow awash with flowers of all hues. A big sign prominently posted by the gate stated, “No Trespassing Allowed”.

The old man looked around the low-lying, flat meadow and saw no one nor any buildings for miles around. He said to the dog, “I don’t see what harm there could be in the both of us taking a short stroll through this beautiful meadow. Let’s enjoy this delightful sunshiny day with a walk among the flowers.”

The dog eagerly shook his head in agreement and so off they strolled, crisscrossing the meadow and basking in the picturesque scenery. The old man spotted a small stream in the distance where his dog could have a drink of water and they could both cool off. After the dog had enjoyed a short romp in the stream they started walking back toward the road where they had first entered the meadow.

Something seemed different about the meadow now; they’d only been walking for a short time and it was still early afternoon, but the entire meadow had swiftly taken on a radiant golden cast. The flowers appeared more abundant and luminous than before and the air was thick with a soft hazy glow. The old man and his dog were unable to see five feet ahead of them and the old man said, “I think we’d better stop right here for a minute or two until this fog lifts. I can’t see anything, and we sure don’t want to get lost in this soup.”

Just as quickly as the fog had appeared, it lifted, and the old man and his dog found themselves standing directly in front of a large wrought iron gate made of pure gold. Sunshine gleaming off the gate gave it a dazzling luster, brighter than anything the old man had ever seen in his entire life. The dog was a little frightened and began to tremble slightly, since he too had never witnessed anything like this apparition that appeared before them. Within moments there materialized a man in white robes standing before them. “Welcome to Heaven” he said.

The old man’s eyes twinkled and his face lit up like a shining lamp. He clapped his hands and said, “Oh, how I had hoped for this all my life.” He was filled with joy, and looking at his faithful companion he said, “Cody, let’s go. This is HEAVEN!” He started off though the gate, his dog following, vigorously wagging its tail, happy for the old man, even though he himself had no idea what “heaven” was.

The gatekeeper abruptly stopped him. “Sir, dogs are not allowed in Heaven. I’m sorry but he can’t come with you.”

“What kind of Heaven won’t allow dogs?”, the old man shot back. “If he can’t come in, then neither will I. I’ll just stay out here with him. He’s been my faithful companion all his life, and I’m not going to abandon him now.”

“Suit yourself”, said the man in the robes. “But I warn you, the Devil lives on the other side of that winding road and he’ll try to sweet talk you into coming over to his side. He’ll promise you anything, but beware, your dog can’t go over there either. If you won’t leave your dog, you’ll have no choice but to spend eternity walking up and down that road.”

The old man snorted in disgust and signaled to his dog. Off they trotted towards the painted wooden gate that had led them into the meadow.

After walking some distance on the dusty old road, they came to a rundown fence with a hole in it. There was no gate leading into the big, grassy field that lay just beyond the fence, only the hole. Inside the field stood a man dressed in black, stirring up the ground with an broken hoe.

“Excuse me, Sir”, said the old man. “My dog and I are getting awfully tired. Would you mind if we came in and sat in the shade of your big apple tree for a little while?”

“Not at all”, said the man in black. “There’s cold water under that tree over there. Make yourselves comfortable.”

“Is it okay for my dog to come in too? The man down the road said dogs weren’t allowed in here either.”

“Would you come in if you had to leave your dog outside?”

“Oh, no Sir, that’s why I didn’t go into Heaven. I was told my dog couldn’t go in, so I guess the two of us will be spending eternity on this road. But right now some cold water and shade would be so good for the both of us. But, I won’t come in if my faithful companion here can’t come too. And that’s final.”

The man in black smiled benevolently and said “Welcome to Heaven.”

“You mean this is Heaven?”, the old man asked in great surprise. “Dogs ARE allowed in Heaven? How come that man in the white robes down the road told me dogs weren’t allowed in Heaven?”

“That was the Devil, and he gets all the people who are willing to give up a life-long companion in exchange for a comfortable place to stay. They soon find out the mistake they have made, but by then it’s too late.”

“Now GOD wouldn’t allow dogs to be banned from Heaven, would he. After all, HE created them to be man’s best companion in life. Why would he separate them from each other in death?”

The old man grinned from ear to ear and said, “You are absolutely right! This is the place for us and I am now really, really happy to be here!”. Then he and his dog Cody, trotted side by side into Heaven and were happy together for eternity.

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