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The #1 source for immediate, long-term relief for dogs suffering from degenerative diseases like hip dysplasia, OCD and arthritis.

We are specialists in the treatment of canine joint disease and its accompanying pain.

Let us help put an end to your dog’s suffering, joint stiffness, pain, immobility, and poor quality of life. Our proven products will help you easily accomplish this without the use of drugs or invasive surgery.

Joint Issues

  • Hip Dysplasia
  • Arthritis
  • Osteochondritis (OCD)
  • Stiffness/Inflammation
  • Ligament Tears
  • Growing Pains
  • Mobility Problems
  • Joint Pain
  • Back/Spinal Problems
  • Hypertrophic Osteodystrophy (HOD)


Is your pet becoming less active, less playful, or desiring shorter walks? The following symptoms could be early signs of OCD, Arthritis or Hip Dysplasia.

  • Moving more slowly
  • Difficulty getting up
  • Weight shift to another leg
  • Personality change
  • Reluctant to walk, jump or play
  • Refuses using stairs or the car
  • Change in appetite
  • Change in behavior
  • Muscle atrophy
  • Lagging behind
  • Yelping when touched
  • Limping
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Posts Tagged ‘Degenerative Joint Disease’

Senility and Cognitive Dysfunction in Senior Dogs

Monday, May 20th, 2013

If you notice that your older dog is exhibiting behavior problems, it may be senility or cognitive dysfunction that accounts for the behavior. Senility and cognitive dysfunction affects dogs in the same way that Alzheimer’s disease affects humans. Recent medical studies have shown that many senior dogs with senility and cognitive dysfunction problems have lesions in their brains that are very similar to what is seen in Alzheimer’s patients.

Studies undertaken by major companies in the pet industry have revealed that 62% of all dogs ten years of age and older will experience at least some of the following symptoms, which usually indicate canine cognitive dysfunction:

* Confusion or disorientation that causes a dog to get lost in its own yard, or to wander aimlessly around the house, and become trapped in a corner or behind furniture.
* An obvious decreased level of activity.
* Constant pacing during the night, or being unable to sleep at night.
* Anxiety and increased irritability.
* An increase in barking, whining, or howling.
* A decreased ability to perform common tasks or to respond to its owners’ commands.
* Long periods of inattentiveness, appearing to just stare into space.
* A continuing inability to recognize family members or old friends.

To make the correct diagnosis of senility or cognitive dysfunction, a veterinarian first has to rule out other possible causes of the dog’s behavior problems. A marked decrease in activity may not be caused by senility or cognitive dysfunction, but might be due to advancing arthritis or hip dysplasia that could be successfully treated with Winston’s Joint System. Dogs who suffer from severe joint diseases such as arthritis, bursitis, osteochondrosis (OCD), hip dysplasia or other degenerative problems with the shoulders, elbows and hocks are able to experience immediate and long-term relief without dangerous drugs when given a daily regimen of Winston’s Joint System. Winston’s is a combination of three, totally-natural whole food supplements developed by a Naturopathic Doctor for his own dog. There are no side-effects and there are no dosage problems because your dog’s body uses only what it needs.

If it is determined that your dog does not have physical problems and is suffering from senility or cognitive dysfunction, a vet will probably prescribe one of the major drugs, Selegiline or Anipry. These drugs are not a cure for senility or cognitive dysfunction but can alleviate some of the symptoms. If a dog responds well to either of these drugs, it will need to be given the medication every day for the rest of its life. There are some unpleasant side effects with these two drugs so it’s important to ask your vet what these side effects are and how dangerous they might be to your pet before you decide on administering these drugs to your dog.

An excellent supplement that can help aging dogs is Winston’s Senior Complete Multi vitamin and mineral supplement. This is a powerful and complete once-daily multi vitamin for dogs that are five years and older. This complete multi vitamin contains almost 50 active ingredients from the healthiest sources available.

It’s vitally important that dogs who are diagnosed with senility or cognitive dysfunction continue to be exercised and played with on a regular basis. If your senior dog is experiencing behavior problems, schedule an appointment with your veterinarian to have your dog tested and evaluated to determine if senility or cognitive dysfunction is accounting for the drastic change in behavior.

Early intervention and proper, loving care can help your dog have a more happy and healthy life in its senior years.

Arthritis in Dogs: Causes, Symptoms and Treatments

Monday, May 6th, 2013

Arthritis in dogs is a debilitating condition affecting approximately 20% of all adult dogs. Arthritis generally develops when a dog is older but it can also affect younger dogs.

In order to provide a better quality of life for a dog with arthritis a dog owner needs to understand arthritis, its symptoms, and what treatments are available for an affected dog.

Arthritis in Dogs: Causes, Symptoms and Treatments

What is arthritis in dogs

Arthritis in dogs is one of the most common medical conditions that affects our beloved pets.

Arthritis is a general term that is used to describe several different diseases that basically affect a dog’s joints in similar ways.

A simple way to describe and to understand arthritis in a dog is that the disease causes painful inflammation of the dog’s joints.

Because arthritis occurs in about one in five adult dogs, it is one of the most common diseases treated by veterinarians.

Like arthritis in humans, arthritis in dogs cannot be cured.

The good news is that arthritis in dogs is not inevitably hopeless. There are a number of effective treatments on the market today that can help ease your dog’s symptoms, allowing your pet to live a longer, active life.

What causes it

Since arthritis itself is more of a general condition rather than one specific disease, many other diseases like hip dysplasia, OCD, and degenerative joint disease are linked to it. A dog with arthritis will usually develop hip dysplasia or degenerative joint disease as the arthritis progresses.

There are several causes for arthritis in dogs. The condition can be genetic, as is the case with hip dysplasia, and it can also develop as the result of an infection or an immune disorder that affects the dog’s joints.

Arthritis in dogs associated with degenerative joint disease is caused by repetitive pressure on a dog’s bones and is common to aging dogs.

This type of arthritis can occur in younger dogs if they are genetically predisposed to the affliction. However, it’s more common in older dogs because their joints become lax after many years of use.

Because this type of arthritis is normally age-related, the treatment options are limited to alleviating the symptoms.

In some cases, the arthritis is associated with an autoimmune disorder where the immune system mistakenly begins attacking the dog’s muscles and bones, thereby reducing the functioning of the joints and causing inflammation and irritation.

There often is a genetic predisposition toward this type of arthritis in certain breeds.
Whether or not an affected dog is among those breeds is not important; it is imperative that a veterinarian determine why the dog’s immune system is malfunctioning and start the appropriate treatment as soon as the malady is diagnosed.


Signs and symptoms of arthritis in a dog will usually manifest over time, unless an autoimmune disease is the cause. Also, these signs or symptoms are often mistaken for other disorders.

The following symptoms may indicate arthritis in a dog:

  • Limping
  • Weight gain not caused by excessive overeating
  • Obvious favoring of one leg over the other
  • Acting less alert
  • Sleeping much more than usual
  • Avoiding the use of stairs
  • Having a lot of difficulty standing
  • A painful appearance when walking
  • A progressive unwillingness to exercise, play, or go for the usual walk
  • Urinating or defecating inside the house after being housebroken for many years

Treatment of arthritis in dogs

A veterinarian will decide on treatment options after conducting several tests on the dog to try to determine what factors are contributing to the disorder. The tests will include X-rays, blood work and occasionally an ultrasound.

• Dietary restrictions are often an integral part of any treatment for arthritis, since a reduction in weight helps alleviate some of the symptoms of arthritis in overweight dogs. A regular, easygoing exercise routine will be recommended to prevent too much pressure being placed on the dog’s weakening joints.

• Non-steroidal, anti-inflammatory medications like Rimadyl are sometimes used to help reduce inflammation in the dog’s joints. Rimadyl is a pain killer that veterinarians sometimes prescribe for dogs suffering from arthritis.

There are many pros and cons about giving a dog Rimadyl for arthritis pain. As a responsible pet owner, it would be a very good idea to research this drug as thoroughly as you can before giving your dog the medication.

⇒ Read more about painkillers and the side-effects of Rimadyl.

• A much safer treatment, and one that many owners and vets agree is more effective, is to start an arthritic dog on a daily regimen of Winston’s Joint System, an all-natural formula developed by a Naturopathic Doctor to heal his own beloved dog who suffered from arthritis and hip dysplasia. This proven formula has been giving relief from pain and stiffness to all breeds and ages of dogs for over 20 years with remarkable results. Owners report that their pets have new vitality and alertness now that they are free of pain.

If the arthritis is not extremely severe and advanced to the point that your dog cannot walk at all without the aid of braces or a dog cart or wheelchair, the most common treatment for arthritis in dogs are supplements like Winston’s Joint System.

• In addition to feeding your dog Winston’s Joint System, you should massage its arthritic joints for about 10 minutes at least twice a day.

• And when you put your dog to bed for the night, apply heat using a heat pad or a hot water bottle.

Heat pads can be purchased specifically for dogs with conditions like arthritis, but a regular heat pad kept around the house for human use works just as well.

The heat works to relax the muscles and promotes increased mobility and activity. Just be sure that the heat level is low to medium, never set it on high, as too much heat could be very uncomfortable or even dangerous for your dog. We humans know when a heat pad is set too high and we simply turn the level down; but remember, not only does your dog have no fingers to work the switch, it also is unable to let you know if the heat is too high.

You can also use a hot water bottle in place of a heat pad. There are newer hot water bottles available that have fleece covers which feel softer on your dog’s body.

Arthritis in dogs treatment options

Heated pet beds are also available online or from most pet stores. You can also purchase an orthopedic bed with a heat element. This helps distribute your dog’s body weight and eliminates pressure points while soothing the joints and muscles.

• You may also want to consider the Canine Cooler Bed which uses revolutionary SoothSoft Technology to give your dog the very best in comfort. The fluid-enhanced design offers a dry, cooling effect with superior cushioning and support which is perfect for dogs that are always kept indoors year-round in 78-80 degree temperatures.

The bed is especially good for dogs with arthritis, excess weight, or Cushings Disease, and work great for dogs who are old, very large, who usually sleep on hard floors, or are recovering from surgery or illness.

The Canine Cooler Bed gives your dog a constant cool spot in summer, relief from furnace and fireplace heat in winter, and cushiony support for vulnerable joints all year.

• Lastly, if you live in a part of the country that gets very cold in the winter, keep your dog warm inside and outside the house with clothing made especially for dogs. Many of these products are constructed of breathable material that insulates your dog’s body and keeps the chill out.

Arthritis in dogs can cause a lot of pain so try to make your arthritic dog as comfortable as you would like to be if you suffered from – or do suffer from – arthritic pain. It will make your dog’s life much easier and happier, and your dog will love you even more for the help you provide it.

Arthritis in dogs can have many causes and the symptoms are sometimes misdiagnosed as being another condition or ailment of an affected dog. The treatments for arthritis are limited, and many dog owners prefer the safety of a supplement like Winston’s Joint System rather than the sometimes questionable efficacy of a drug like Rimadyl.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis and all joint, pain and mobility issues.
There is an excellent chance we can help your dog, so please contact us at: www.dogshealth.com or call our toll free number at 888-901-5557.

Joint Disease in Dogs

Monday, March 11th, 2013

It’s inevitable that many dogs will develop some form of joint disease during their lives. It may be mild and unnoticeable, or it could be debilitating, severely affecting a dog’s quality of life by causing complete lameness and the inability to get up and down without help.

Joint Disease in Dogs

Some dogs will develop joint disease in the first few years of their lives but not display any visible signs until much later in life. This is often dependent on the dog’s breed. Dogs are also very susceptible to arthritis, and larger dog breeds are more vulnerable than smaller breeds.

The most common signs of joint disease in dogs include stiffness, limping, or favoring one limb over another. After awakening from sleep a dog with joint disease may find it difficult to get up or be reluctant to climb stairs.

Diseases that can affect a dog’s joints fall into ten major classifications. These joint diseases occur as a result of
(1) ligament, tendon, or muscle disease,
(2) bone fractures involving the joint,
(3) dietary and hormonal diseases such as hyperparathyroidism and obesity,
(4) developmental disorders like hip dysplasia and elbow dysplasia or OCD,
(5) congenital disorders,
(6) metabolic disorders,
(7) cancer,
(8) inflammatory joint diseases like Lyme disease or rheumatoid arthritis,
(9) degenerative joint disease (osteoarthritis), and
(10) degenerative spinal joint disease.

Treatment of joint disease in dogs

The treatment of hip dysplasia and osteoarthritis has vastly improved with the introduction of supplements like Winston’s Joint System.

Because hip dysplasia is primarily an inherited condition, there is no product on the market that can prevent its development, only treat it.

Dogs with hip dysplasia will need to be fed a proper diet and be put on a limited exercise routine.

There are anti-inflammatories like Rimadyl that are used to relieve a dog’s pain. Since Rimadyl and other drugs are controlled substances, they are available only through veterinarians.

Unfortunately, drugs like Rimadyl cannot decrease the progression of degenerative joint disease and often have serious side effects. You should consult with your vet and learn about all the possible side effects before agreeing to treat your dog with prescription medications such as Rimadyl.

Surgery is sometimes performed on dogs with serious cases of hip dysplasia. These surgeries are not always able to stop the progression of the disease and some dogs benefit only by having their lives made a little more comfortable.

Because of the high cost of this type of surgery and the questionable value of performing the procedure on older dogs, the management of pain and inflammation remains the only realistic option for many pet owners.

Weight management is very important for all dogs suffering from hip dysplasia. If surgery or other medical procedure is deemed necessary, the results will be more beneficial if the dog is not overweight.

Up to half of the dogs in the U.S. are overweight, so chances are very good that dogs with hip dysplasia or osteoarthritis are also overweight. Helping a dog lose pounds and get back to its recommended weight is one of the most important things a dog owner can do to help their pet who is suffering from hip dysplasia or arthritis.

Dogs who are overweight and are diagnosed with hip dysplasia or arthritis need to be exercised in ways that provide a good range of motion and muscle building, while limiting wear and tear on the dog’s joints.

Walking, swimming, slow jogging, and going up and down stairs are excellent low-impact exercises. An exercise program should be tailored to a dog based on the severity of the hip dysplasia or osteoarthritis.

The dog’s weight and physical condition must be factored into planning the types of exercise it should be subjected to. The wrong type of exercise can cause harm to the dog. A veterinarian will be able to recommend the best exercise program that’s appropriate for the dog’s condition.

Glucosamine and chondroitin are two supplements commonly used to treat animals for osteoarthritis. They are effective on some dogs but not on all dogs.

Glucosamine is the major sugar found in the important building blocks necessary for the synthesis and maintenance of joint cartilage.

Chondroitin enhances this synthesis and prevents damage of enzymes in the joint. These products are not painkillers.

Glucosamine and chondroitin work on the dog’s cartilage-forming cells in an attempt to repair the damaged cartilage. These products take at least six weeks to begin their healing, and if successful, a dog will need to continue taking the products for the rest of their lives to prevent further cartilage breakdown.

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been developed for dogs with osteoarthritis. Carprofen, marketed as Rimadyl is the best known of these medications. It is a strong painkiller and anti-inflammatory agent, and is available only by prescription because of its potential for serious side effects.

A much safer treatment for dogs suffering with joint diseases such as arthritis, bursitis, osteochondrosis (OCD), hip dysplasia and other degenerative joint disease is Winston’s Joint System, a combination of three, totally-natural whole food supplements developed by a Naturopathic Doctor for his own dog. Winston’s contains no potentially dangerous drugs.

Winston’s Joint System provides many of the raw materials essential for the synthesis of the joint-lubricating synovial fluid as well as the repair of articular cartilage and connective tissue. Within the first 30 days of treatment, dogs on Winston’s show noticeable and often remarkable improvement.

Joint disease in dogs is a condition that affects such a large number of pet dogs and there is no known cure. Surgery works for some dogs but is almost prohibitively expensive. No dog should have to suffer with these debilitating diseases and that is the reason Winston’s Joint System was originally developed.

If your dog has been diagnosed with arthritis, bursitis, osteochondrosis (OCD), hip dysplasia or other degenerative joint disease, you owe it to your pet to help make its life better by treating it with Winston’s proven formula.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis and all joint, pain and mobility issues.
There is an excellent chance we can help your dog, so please contact us at: www.dogshealth.com or call our toll free number at 888-901-5557.

Degenerative Joint Disease – What Is It, Causes, Symptoms & Treatment

Monday, June 6th, 2011

The terms arthritis, osteoarthritis, hip dysplasia, OCD, and degenerative joint disease are often used to describe the same joint problems in dogs.

But no matter what it is called, the result is pain and inflammation in a dog’s joints. The term “arthritis” is the most common one used to describe this joint disease that can easily -and usually does at some point- incapacitate a dog.

What is Degenerative Joint Disease?

What is Degenerative Joint Disease?

Degenerative joint disease is characterized by the loss of the smooth cartilage that covers and protects the end of the bones in the dog’s movable joints.

There are no nerves in the cartilage, so when it touches the cartilage of another bone, the dog feels no pain.

But when the cartilage wears away due to aging or joint disease, the bone becomes exposed. The bone does have nerves, so when the two bone ends in a joint touch each other, it results in pain and inflammation – sure signs that some form of degenerative joint disease is present.

In degenerative joint disease, small bony projections form on the bone that is close to the joint. This adds considerably to a dog’s pain. This type of degenerative joint disease is progressive, meaning it continues to get worse until the poor dog has considerable difficulty getting up and down by itself. The pain is so severe in some dogs that they are unable to stand or walk.

What causes degenerative joint disease?

Degenerative joint disease can occur simply as a result of wear and tear on an otherwise normal joint and occurs as the dog ages. Veterinarians refer to this stage of the disease as “primary degenerative joint disease”.

Osteoarthritis may also occur as a result of another condition that affects a dog’s joints. This is what is known as “secondary degenerative joint disease” and is identified either as hip dysplasia or elbow dysplasia.

Which dogs are at risk of developing degenerative joint disease?

Certainly any dog with a congenital joint problem, like hip dysplasia, is going to be more prone to developing degenerative joint disease.

Dogs who have had injury to a joint such as a fracture involving the joint, or a ruptured ligament in the knee will be more likely to develop arthritis.

What are the symptoms of degenerative joint disease?

The symptoms of arthritis will vary as to which joints are involved, the age of the dog, and the severity of the disease.

The first symptoms an owner usually notices is a change in the way a dog walks since the dog will try to put more of its weight on the unaffected limbs. There may be muscle atrophy (reduction in the size of the muscle) in the affected limb because the dog is using it less, or at least putting less weight on it.

For a dog with hip dysplasia in both hind legs, the muscles of those legs may be thin, where the muscles of the chest and shoulders may increase in size because the dog is putting more weight on the front legs.

Many times the dog may find it difficult to get up after lying down and appears to be stiff. The dog also may be unable to jump up into the car. Many dogs with degenerative joint disease find it difficult to go up or down stairs.

Degenerative Joint Disease Symptoms

Depending upon the amount of pain the dog is experiencing, its appetite may change and it may also choose to be alone more often.

The dog’s joints are generally not swollen and the pain it experiences is a dull aching type, so a dog usually will not cry out in pain. Some dogs will lick or bite at the area that is painful, while others will seek out warm or soft places to sleep.

How is degenerative joint disease diagnosed?

Your veterinarian will take a history of your dog’s symptoms and perform a complete physical exam. X-rays will be taken. Other lab tests or more detailed exams of the affected joints may be undertaken.

⇒ Further reading: Hip dysplasia in dogs – Part 2: Diagnosis & Treatment

How is degenerative joint disease treated?

Some forms of degenerative joint disease can be treated without surgery. Winston’s Joint System is an all-natural formula developed by a Naturopathic Doctor to heal his own beloved dog. For over 20 years, this proven formula has been giving relief from the pain and stiffness of degenerative joint diseases to all breeds and ages of dogs. Owners who have discovered and used Winston’s report that their pets have a new-found vitality and alertness now that they are free of pain.

Degenerative joint disease does not heal itself. It is a progressive, debilitating disease that will continue to worsen without treatment. This is all the more reason to start your dog on Winston’s Joint System as soon as your vet gives you a diagnosis of hip dysplasia, arthritis, OCD, or any degenerative joint disease.

Winston’s is a tried and proven formula that will slow down the progression of your dog’s joint disease and many dogs will respond well and can live comfortably for years. Your dog will love you for the gift of years of pain-free living.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis and all joint, pain and mobility issues.
There is an excellent chance we can help your dog, so please contact us at: www.dogshealth.com or call our toll free number at 888-901-5557.

Hip Dysplasia in American Mastiffs

Tuesday, January 11th, 2011

In an attempt to deal with the issue of hip dysplasia in American Mastiffs, Fredericka Wagner of Flying W Farms crossed an English Mastiff with an Anatolian Mastiff, a very old mastiff breed known for its intelligence and lengthy lifespan for a large breed.

Through selective breeding, the American Mastiff was created.

Hip Dysplasia in American Mastiffs

The American Mastiffs

American Mastiffs are calm, quiet dogs and are ideal for families with children. They are docile, good-natured dogs, but are very protective of their human owners.

American Mastiff dogs come in three colors – fawn, apricot and brindle. When puppies are born they are dark in color and tend to lighten and achieve their true color by the age of one.

American Mastiffs tend to be healthy and happy dogs with fewer reported incidents of many of the health problems generally seen in other large breeds. However, the Mastiff suffers from some of the same health problems common in other purebred dogs.

Mastiffs are susceptible to heart disease, cancer, and canine hip dysplasia –with hip dysplasia being the most common.

Hip Dysplasia in American Mastiffs

Canine Hip Dysplasia affects millions of dogs every year and can result in debilitating orthopedic disease of the hips. Many Mastiffs suffer from hip dysplasia, osteochondritis (OCD), and arthritis, resulting in a shortened lifespan and a reduced quality of life.

Hip dysplasia is an abnormal development of the hip causing excessive wear of the joint cartilage during weight bearing, eventually leading to the development of arthritis, often called degenerative joint disease or osteoarthritis.

Winston’s Joint System has a history of successful treatment of hip dysplasia in American Mastiffs. Winston’s is a combination of three natural whole food supplements developed by a Naturopathic Doctor for his own dog. It contains no drugs and has no side-effects because it’s just good whole food.

Winston’s provides many of the raw materials essential for the synthesis of the joint-lubricating synovial fluid as well as the repair of articular cartilage and connective tissue. Within the first 30 days of treatment, dogs on Winston’s Joint System show noticeable and often remarkable improvement.

Mastiffs are inclined to be lazy but they will stay in better and healthier condition if given regular exercise.

They should be taken on regular daily walks to help release their mental and physical energy. They can live acceptably well in a small house or apartment if sufficiently exercised.

They are comparatively inactive indoors, so their ideal living conditions should consist of at least a small yard or daily walks.

If given the proper care and training, the Mastiff can be a loyal and protective member of your family.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis and all joint, pain and mobility issues.
There is an excellent chance we can help your dog, so please contact us at: www.dogshealth.com or call our toll free number at 888-901-5557.

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