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  • Hip Dysplasia
  • Arthritis
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Symptoms

Is your pet becoming less active, less playful, or desiring shorter walks? The following symptoms could be early signs of OCD, Arthritis or Hip Dysplasia.

  • Moving more slowly
  • Difficulty getting up
  • Weight shift to another leg
  • Personality change
  • Reluctant to walk, jump or play
  • Refuses using stairs or the car
  • Change in appetite
  • Change in behavior
  • Muscle atrophy
  • Lagging behind
  • Yelping when touched
  • Limping
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Archive for the ‘Dog CPR’ Category

Pet CPR and First Aid

Monday, November 10th, 2014


There could come a time when knowing how to administer CPR and first aid to your dog may mean the difference between saving its life or not.

If your pet is involved in an accident and has been seriously injured, one of the first things you should do is make sure your dog is still breathing. To check its breathing, gently tap your dog, call its name, and watch for up and down movement of its chest so you know if it’s still breathing. Listen carefully to its breathing and try to feel the breath on your cheek or the back of your hand.

If your dog is not breathing, pull its tongue out a little bit, close its mouth and tilt its head slightly to open its airway. Give the dog 4 to 5 breaths from your mouth to its nose. This is called Mouth-to-Snout resuscitation as opposed to Mouth-to-Mouth given to humans. Give the dog just enough air to make its chest rise. Big dogs will need more air than little dogs.

You must check for a pulse. A Femoral Pulse is the easiest to check. This pulse point is located inside the rear leg towards the top of the leg. If your dog has a pulse but is still not breathing, give it Mouth-to-Snout resuscitation and check again for a Femoral Pulse.

If there is still no pulse, place the dog on the ground or a hard surface with its right side facing down. Take its left front leg and bend it at the elbow, rotating the leg at its shoulder. The point where the dog’s elbow touches the body is where you place your hands for compressions. Put one hand on top of the other and clasp your fingers together. Lock your elbows and start performing compressions. Push approximately 2 to 3 inches deep as you compress. Follow this with Mouth-to-Snout resuscitation. After 1 minute check for a pulse. If there is no response start the compressions again, continuing until the dog starts breathing on its own.

Emergency Vet Visit

Monday, October 6th, 2014


Picture this scenario: Your beloved pet has just been hit by a car. Your dog is obviously in great pain and suffering from broken bones, internal bleeding, or both. Your immediate response will be an emergency vet visit.

When your dog is seriously injured and you need to make an emergency trip to the animal hospital, there are some steps you can take to make it less stressful for both you and your dog. An emergency visit is never the same as a regular visit to the vet.

If possible, call the animal hospital before you leave home and let the staff know you are on your way with a seriously injured pet. This will alert the emergency vet and hospital team, giving them time to prepare for immediate treatment upon your arrival, which could possibly make a difference in saving your dog’s life.

As calmly as possible given the seriousness of the situation, describe your dog’s symptoms as carefully as you can. The staff may need to give you some first aid steps to perform before coming to the hospital.

As soon as your dog reaches the animal hospital or emergency pet clinic, the front desk nurse or receptionist will call for “triage.” This term simply means that a team which includes the emergency vet, will examine your dog’s condition and ask questions about your pet and an explanation of what caused the injury. The vet will determine if your pet must be immediately scheduled for surgery or whether its injuries can be treated in one of the examination rooms. You may be asked to sign a release for your dog to be treated.

If surgery is deemed necessary, you’ll be asked to have a seat in the waiting room while your pet is undergoing surgery. Fully staffed animal hospitals will have a technician update you on your dog’s progress as the procedure progresses.

When your pet’s surgery has been completed, a member of the emergency veterinary team will discuss your dog’s prognosis, any at-home care required, and when a follow up appointment is needed. The vet may recommend that you leave your pet in the hospital overnight, or possibly for a few days for further observation.

If your pet is hospitalized, you will usually be allowed to personally check on your dog’s progress during regular animal hospital visiting hours. A competent and caring staff may also call to keep you updated on your pet’s recovery and progress.

When it comes time to bring your dog home, the hospital staff will give you detailed instructions for continued at-home care, including any medications the vet has prescribed.

When an emergency vet visit is necessary to save the life of your seriously injured dog, it helps to know what your responsibilities will be in order to help your injured pet receive the appropriate care it needs as quickly as possible.

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