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The #1 source for immediate, long-term relief for dogs suffering from degenerative diseases like hip dysplasia, OCD and arthritis.

We are specialists in the treatment of canine joint disease and its accompanying pain.

Let us help put an end to your dog’s suffering, joint stiffness, pain, immobility, and poor quality of life. Our proven products will help you easily accomplish this without the use of drugs or invasive surgery.

Joint Issues

  • Hip Dysplasia
  • Arthritis
  • Osteochondritis (OCD)
  • Stiffness/Inflammation
  • Ligament Tears
  • Growing Pains
  • Mobility Problems
  • Joint Pain
  • Back/Spinal Problems
  • Hypertrophic Osteodystrophy (HOD)

Symptoms

Is your pet becoming less active, less playful, or desiring shorter walks? The following symptoms could be early signs of OCD, Arthritis or Hip Dysplasia.

  • Moving more slowly
  • Difficulty getting up
  • Weight shift to another leg
  • Personality change
  • Reluctant to walk, jump or play
  • Refuses using stairs or the car
  • Change in appetite
  • Change in behavior
  • Muscle atrophy
  • Lagging behind
  • Yelping when touched
  • Limping
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Archive for the ‘Dog Grooming’ Category

How to be a Pet Groomer

Monday, July 20th, 2015


Are you thinking about starting a career as a pet groomer? Pet grooming is ideal for people who love animals, but make no bones about it, a career in the pet grooming business can be difficult to get started in. But once you’ve established yourself as a qualified and experienced groomer it can be a very rewarding career and a lot of fun working with dogs of all sizes and types of coats.

To become a successful pet groomer you’ll need to enroll in a professional grooming school. These schools can be found in the yellow pages of your local directory, or for quicker searching use the internet. Professional schools provide their students with the tools, techniques and skills needed to break into the pet grooming profession.

It may surprise you to know that many people who work as dog groomers haven’t attended a professional school, but instead learned the grooming procedures and techniques by taking correspondence courses or night classes at their local college.

As a new dog groomer just starting in the business, it helps to get a job with an established grooming shop as a trainee or assistant. Working for a good dog grooming service will provide you with hands-on experience and the additional training needed to assist you in propelling your career forward in the pet grooming business.

There are many different breeds of dogs, all requiring special techniques for proper grooming. As a dog groomer you’ll have to know how to groom every breed of dog. For example, the grooming style of a Golden Retriever is very different than that of a Yorkie.

When you have been trained and are starting your career, you can ask friends and family if they will let you practice your grooming skills on their pet dogs at no cost to them. This will help you in improving your skills and your friends and family will probably be eager to give you a good reference when you’re searching for the right place in which to begin your career.

When you’re finally ready to be a pet groomer and you feel comfortable enough to proudly say so, you can choose whether you want to work in an established grooming shop, work from home, or even set up a mobile dog grooming business and travel to a client’s home.

Why Do Dogs Lose Their Hair

Monday, April 13th, 2015


Dogs lose their hair in the spring and fall and this is simply a dog’s natural process of shedding. But if your dog starts losing too much hair, or loses a lot of hair throughout the year, you need to determine what’s causing the loss. Excessive hair loss can result in the dog having bald patches on parts of its body.

It’s possible that a vitamin deficiency is causing your dog to lose its hair. To prevent vitamin or mineral deficiency in your dog, start it on a daily regimen of Winston’s Senior Complete Multi, the most powerful and complete once a day multi vitamin for dogs 5 years and older. Don’t let the word “Senior” in the product name cause you to think it’s only good for older dogs. Many dogs are seniors at 5 and 6 years, but lots of dogs are still young at that age and they have many possible years of life left.

It helps to know that certain kinds of food can also affect your dog’s skin and coat and result in excessive shedding. A dog whose diet is lacking in good nutritional value can lose hair and have a coat that looks unhealthy. You may need to consult with your vet to find the best kind of food to keep your dog’s coat looking good and shedding less.

Another reason dogs lose their hair is because of skin allergies that cause itchiness and rashes, and when your dog licks and scratches the area it can result in hair loss and bald patches. Skin problems can also be caused by airborne allergens, some foods, chemicals, or parasites. These types of allergies can be treated with antihistamines, allergy shots, parasite medication and topical ointments containing steroids.

Fleas, mites and worms are some of the most common parasites that cause skin irritations and hair loss on dogs. Parasites leach the nutrients from your dog’s body and result in an unhealthy looking coat and hair loss. Some parasites like fleas cause extreme itchiness in a dog and the dog will scratch his skin excessively, causing wounds, possible bleeding, and hair loss.

To kill the parasites you’ll need to use a special formula shampoo available at most major pet stores to get rid of the skin parasites and soothe the dog’s itchiness.

If you notice a large amount of hair loss accompanied by any one of these signs – lethargy, weight loss, or sudden changes in behavior, you should take your dog to the vet as soon as possible. The underlying cause of these signs could be a serious problem, and the sooner you act, the healthier your dog will be.

Why Dogs Shed Hair

Monday, December 22nd, 2014


All dogs shed hair, some breeds more than others. Indoor dogs who shed a lot of hair can fill your house with loose hair and you end up having to frequently vacuum and pick up loose dog hair all the time.

Here are some grooming techniques to help reduce the amount of loose hair and also keep your dog cleaner and healthier.

Frequent grooming and brushing your dog will help soften any coarse hair and reduce the amount of hair your dog sheds. Try to brush your dog every day for 5-10 minutes. Getting suitable supplies for the type of hair your dog has will make it easier to brush it and helps improve the condition of the hair. There are several types of brushes and most dogs will need more than one type of brush. Combs are great for dog breeds with shorter hair.

Dogs shed hair all year round but especially so during the shedding seasons, usually spring and fall. You should bathe your dog at least once a week to reduce the amount of hair it sheds. Buy shampoos that won’t irritate your dog’s skin because they can cause additional hair shedding.

Brush your dog’s coat going from its tail to its head. At lot of dog owners brush from the head to the tail but brushing from tail to head results in a more thorough removal of dead hair.

A Shedding Blade available from the pet store can be used to more effectively remove hair and other debris from your dog’s coat. You may find that using a shedding blade is more effective than either a dog brush or comb.

If the weather outside is comfortable for you and your dog, grooming it outdoors will save you a lot of effort when it’s time to clean up the hair shed in your house.

Sometimes modifying the dog’s diet will reduce its shedding. Feed your dog a diet with sufficient nutrients and fatty acids. You can also buy supplements and liquid formulas at most pet stores to prevent excessive shedding.

Dogs shed hair on a daily basis and it is common to all dogs, especially dogs with longer coats.

If you care for your dog using the techniques described above, you’ll not only have an easier time with shedding hair, but you’ll also have a beautifully groomed dog that is a pleasure to hug and cuddle with.

Why Do Dogs Chew Their Paws?

Monday, December 8th, 2014


Dogs enjoy chewing on lots of things, including their own paws at times. But why do dogs chew their paws?

If a dog has an emotional problem like separation anxiety, it may chew on its paws. Stress is also one of the major causes of why dogs chew their paws and this stress can be triggered by a past event or a continuing irritant in a dog’s environment.

Some of the most common reasons for a dog to be stressed are listed below:
(1) A new person arrives in the family, like a newborn baby, and the dog is frequently ignored;
(2) A new pet is brought into the household;
(3) Abusive behavior by the current dog owner or by a previous owner;
(4) Separation from its owner or abandonment (this can result in separation anxiety and cause a dog to chew on its paws and skin);
(5) A serious lack of affection from the dog’s owners.

There are other factors that can trigger severe stress in a dog and cause it to chew on its paws; but whatever the cause, it’s important to identify it and work to change that motivation as quickly as possible. Once the dog feels comfortable and safe, the chewing on its paws should end.

It’s also possible and quite likely, that dogs who are bored or dogs with too much energy will find a way to occupy their time, and that usually results in destructive behavior, of which chewing their paws is just one example. You can help change this unwanted behavior by making sure your dog gets plenty of exercise and attention.

Chewing the paws can also be a reaction to a skin infection caused by a virus, bacteria or fungi. The dog will try to soothe the itching by licking and chewing at its skin. A vet can prescribe antibiotics to eliminate the skin infection and once the dog has healthy skin again it will usually stop chewing its paws.

An allergic reaction also causes dogs to chew their paws. These allergies could be caused by food or something the dog has inhaled. Antihistamines or steroid creams will ease the itchiness, but you’ll need to determine what the dog is allergic to and eliminate the dog’s access to that product or thing causing the adverse reaction.

Removing Pet Odors From Your House

Monday, August 4th, 2014

Removing pet odors from your house can be easy and you’ll create a healthy environment for you and your family or guests. The key to removing these odors is to first remove the source if you expect the smell to completely disappear and not have it return shortly after you’ve cleaned.

If you have a pet dog (or maybe two) you know exactly what it’s like to live with gobs of hair, a sofa and chairs that smell strange, and the ever so popular urine on your rugs and carpets.

Living with your pet day in and day out, it’s easy to get used to these odors and not even notice that sometimes your house smells like a kennel.

The first thing you’ll need to do is give your dog a bath on a regular basis. This will depend on factors like how long your dog’s coat is, whether it’s strictly an inside dog or whether it always runs around your yard, and whether you let your dog roll about in the dirt or whatever it feels like romping around in. If a dog is dirty it will spread mud or filth all over your house.

You’ll also need to be vigilant in removing excess hair from your dog and not wait until it’s all over your furniture.

Once a week remove any dog hair from your furniture using a standard vacuum cleaner with the side attachment. Just vacuum the furniture until all the hair is gone. You can also use a lint roller to pick up the loose hair.

Your floors should be cleaned at least once a week. Rugs and carpets vacuumed, and wood or tile floors swept clean before mopping. On tile or linoleum floors you can use bleach to be sure all the bacteria is killed.

Replace the air conditioning and furnace filters once a month. Loose dog hair tends to stick to filters.

Disinfecting hard surfaces that your dog comes in daily contact with will help remove any lingering odors, and by using a sanitizer you can kill more than 99% of all germs, including cold and flu viruses that may be clinging to surfaces in your home.

Standard spray air fresheners will only mask the scents in your house and you’ll end up with a dog that smells like a pet covered with flowers. Buy a spray that removes odors instead of covering them up.

You’re going to need a pet stain and odor remover if you want to get rid of all urine odors. An inexpensive and just as effective method for removing these odors is to spray the urine stained areas with a mixture of half vinegar and half water.

You should wash your pet’s bedding at least two times a month, then spray it for a fresh, clean scent.

Removing pet odors from your house doesn’t need to be a time consuming chore that you hate to face every week. Just follow the instructions above and soon your house will be free of unpleasant dog odors.

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