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The #1 source for immediate, long-term relief for dogs suffering from degenerative diseases like hip dysplasia, OCD and arthritis.

We are specialists in the treatment of canine joint disease and its accompanying pain.

Let us help put an end to your dog’s suffering, joint stiffness, pain, immobility, and poor quality of life. Our proven products will help you easily accomplish this without the use of drugs or invasive surgery.

Joint Issues

  • Hip Dysplasia
  • Arthritis
  • Osteochondritis (OCD)
  • Stiffness/Inflammation
  • Ligament Tears
  • Growing Pains
  • Mobility Problems
  • Joint Pain
  • Back/Spinal Problems
  • Hypertrophic Osteodystrophy (HOD)

Symptoms

Is your pet becoming less active, less playful, or desiring shorter walks? The following symptoms could be early signs of OCD, Arthritis or Hip Dysplasia.

  • Moving more slowly
  • Difficulty getting up
  • Weight shift to another leg
  • Personality change
  • Reluctant to walk, jump or play
  • Refuses using stairs or the car
  • Change in appetite
  • Change in behavior
  • Muscle atrophy
  • Lagging behind
  • Yelping when touched
  • Limping
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Archive for the ‘Dog Safety’ Category

How to Choose a Dog Groomer

Monday, June 27th, 2016


When you need to find a dog groomer to keep your pet looking its very best, a good place to start is with your regular vet. A lot of veterinarians, especially those with larger facilities or animal hospitals, also offer dog grooming. The groomers employed in facilities like these are professional dog groomers, trained in the correct methods of grooming all breeds of dogs. While keeping your dog looking its best, you’ll also feel safe knowing your pet is receiving the best care available while getting its “haircut.”

There are some important questions you should ask a prospective groomer before committing your pet to the scissors.

(1) What breed or breeds of dogs do they personally own?
(2) Did the groomer go to school to learn dog grooming or did they learn it ‘on the job?’
3) How long have they been grooming dogs?
(4) What breeds do they feel comfortable with and which breeds are they best at grooming?
(5) Do they have more than one style of grooming for different breeds?

Questions to ask the staff at the facility:

(A) What hours does the groomer work?
(B) How are dogs checked in and will they call you when it’s time to pick up your pet?
(C) How far in advance do you need to make an appointment?
(D) What is the fee for grooming and what does the fee include?
(E) What type of shampoos and conditioners are used?
(F) Is the ear hair plucked from breeds with hair in their ear canals?
(G) If your dog refuses to willfully submit to a grooming and needs to be sedated during the grooming, what safeguards does the facility have in place for sedating a dog and is there someone who will monitor your pet during the process?

The relationship you will want to develop with your dog’s groomer should be professional yet friendly. The answers you receive to these questions should help in choosing the best groomer for your pet.

Best Dog Breeds For Families With Kids

Monday, May 16th, 2016


Almost 75 million dogs have been adopted into homes that already owned at least one dog. Multi-dog homes are often good for families with kids. There are other dogs to play with so a dog is not expecting constant attention from your children, or you, all the time, and there is always another dog to play with when the family is away from home.

If you’re considering adopting your very first dog or you want to replace a cherished pet that is no longer with you, it can sometimes be difficult finding the right dog for your family. All dogs are not created equal and each breed has specific traits that may or may not fit into your family situation.

Deciding which dog will make the best pet for your children depends on several things. One being whether someone in the family will have the time to give the dog plenty of exercise. You also need to consider whether a small, quiet dog or a larger, active dog fits the lifestyle of you and your children. Do you have a large home or a home with a yard? Will there be someone at home most of the time?

Answering these questions can help you decide on which breed of dog is best suited to your family’s lifestyle.

Where to find your pet is also an important consideration. Some people prefer to buy a dog from a breeder if they are searching for a purebred. But if you just want the best companion dog you can find for your family, an animal shelter or pet adoption center is probably your best choice. Pet adoption agencies and animal shelters help find homes for loving animals that have, for any number of reasons, ended up neglected, unloved, or unwanted.

The dog of your dreams may right now be living an unhappy, solitary life in the confines of an animal shelter cage. These dogs are so happy to be rescued and given a second chance at life, that they will heap loads of love on your children. Ask the staff at an animal shelter or pet adoption center to help you determine which breed of dog is right for your family.

The following breeds of dogs will provide excellent companionship, loyalty and love:

Labrador Retrievers are the most popular dog breed of all. Labrador Retrievers are friendly, lovable, smart and great with kids. They are the most popular family dog according to breeder surveys.

Golden Retrievers make great family dogs. These large dogs are extremely kind and gentle by nature and they love to play with people of any age. They can also entertain themselves with their toys so they’re not always bothering a member of the household. Just make sure you have enough space in your home as Golden Retrievers can grow to be as large as 90 pounds.

Yorkshire Terriers, also called “Yorkies” for short, are the smallest terriers of all. These tiny dogs are energetic and very protective of their owners, both adults and children. As a result, they don’t always get along well with strangers and they’re not afraid to let a visitor know. Expect a lot of “yapping” if you adopt one of these dogs.

German Shepherds are one of the most intelligent and loyal dog breeds in the world. Because of their high intelligence and great strength they make a great family pet as long as you have room for a large, lovable dog.

The Beagle has been a popular breed for over a century. These cute, lovable dogs were originally raised as hunting dogs and are known for being kind and gentle. They make great family pets.

Dachshunds are also called “wiener dogs’ and have always been a favorite with adults and children because of their cute, sausage-shaped bodies. With long bodies and short legs they look like they couldn’t move very fast but they love to run and play with their owners and each other. They can be very protective and may nip at strangers and other dogs.

Boxers play well with children, are extremely loyal and are low maintenance. They aren’t the most intelligent dogs, but they make up for it by being energetic, headstrong, and fun-loving. They require strong obedience training while they’re young or they may turn out to be unmanageable when they grow into adults.

Poodles come in both standard and miniature sizes. They are popular dogs and are beautiful, loyal and extremely intelligent.

Miniature Schnauzers are smart, obedient and enjoy non-aggressive play with children and adults. They make great pets if you’re looking for a small, lovable dog.

The best dog breed for families with kids is ultimately a personal decision that you as a parent must make. If possible, help save the life of a dog confined to a shelter or pet adoption facility. You’ll never regret the love and devotion a rescued animal will give you and your children.

Dog Saliva – Myths and Facts

Monday, February 22nd, 2016


Dog saliva is often used by canines to help heal their wounds. A dog will instinctively lick its wounds in an attempt to relieve pain. The dog’s saliva forms a film on top of the wound, numbing the area and reducing the pain.

Compounds in dog saliva may assist in healing the wound and will neutralize certain bacteria. However, dog saliva may also contain bacteria that can be harmful to humans.

Dog saliva is believed to contain antibacterial microorganisms, enzymes and antibodies that can speed up the recovery of a dog’s wounds. It’s also thought to be effective in helping a dog fight bacteria such as staphylococcus, streptococcus canis, or E. coli.

One dog saliva myth is that it’s beneficial both for dog wounds and human wounds. There is a bit of truth in this belief, but putting dog saliva on a human wound can result in any number of problems. The bacteria in the saliva may infect a human’s skin and prove to be harmful for the human.

When a dog excessively licks its wounds, it’s not always good for the dog either as it can lead to the formation of acral lick granulomas and patches of hair loss. Also, the dog may develop an obsessive-compulsive behavior of licking, chewing and biting the wound. Some vets believe that when a dog licks its wounds too much it destroys all the benefits canine saliva has on the wounds.

Another dog saliva myth that has been proven wrong is that dogs will pass on their illnesses to you through their saliva. Most of the bacteria in a dog’s saliva is specific to canines and won’t harm humans.

Some other myths and facts about dog saliva include the belief that since dog saliva contains a special enzyme to promote healing of a dog’s wounds, it will have the same effect on human’s cuts. The fact is that enzymes in a dog’s saliva will only work on the wounds of dogs. Allowing your dog to lick your cuts doesn’t mean the cuts will heal faster and it could lead to infection from any germs the dog may have in its mouth.

Another dog saliva fact and a potential health risk from having a wound licked by your dog, is the transmission of roundworms. These intestinal parasites are commonly found in kittens and puppies and are passed through licking of a wound. The symptoms of roundworm are coughing, fever and headaches. Hopefully your dog has been given deworming medication in the past and has subsequently been tested on a regular basis. If this is true, your risk of contracting roundworm is slim.

Hopefully this little tidbit of information about dog saliva myths and facts will spur you to do a little research on your own, even if it’s simply asking your vet for his or her opinion.

Animal Shelter Adoptions

Monday, November 16th, 2015


There are some important questions you need to ask about the health of any dog you’re considering adopting from an animal shelter. Most dogs available for people to adopt from city or county operated animal shelters are mentally stable and physically healthy.

Unfortunately, some dogs being offered for animal shelter adoptions have been abused or neglected by their former owners. Sometimes they have suffered from an illness or disease that might create problems for someone who wants to adopt a dog that will be with them for as long as possible and also won’t require a lot of expensive medical treatments.

To be fair to both yourself and the dog you’re considering for adoption, the questions you should ask the animal shelter staff are:

(1) Has the dog been spayed or neutered? It’s important to know the answer if you don’t want to breed the dog or bear the expense of having the procedure done;

(2) Are all the dog’s vaccinations up to date? Most dogs offered by shelters have had their vaccinations brought up to date, but ask if the dog has just arrived and whether the shelter has had time to give the dog any needed vaccinations;

(3) Has the dog needed any medical treatments since it arrived at the shelter? If it has, what treatments were given and what were they for? This will help you determine whether the dog may acquire certain illnesses in the future;

(4) Does the dog currently require any medications?

(5) Is the dog’s breed or breeds known to the staff? This will help you in understanding what types of health conditions the dog is predisposed to due to its breed, or mixture of breeds;

(6) Does the dog have any behavioral issues? Was the dog given up because it was dangerous or had serious behavior issues? This could definitely become a problem for anyone with small children or who has other dogs or cats in the home;

(7) How long has the dog been at the shelter? If the dog has been there for more than six months there’s a good chance that it may be suffering from mental distress after being cooped up and abandoned for such a long length of time;

(8) What kind of personality does the dog have? If it’s boisterous or overly active, it may not be appropriate for a family or even for a single person who has many time commitments in their life;

(9) Does the dog play well with the other dogs in the shelter or is it aggressive towards them?

If you’re considering an animal shelter adoption, you need to find out the answers to these questions before committing yourself to adopting your first, or next “best friend.”

Should a Dog be Walked in the Rain?

Monday, November 2nd, 2015


Your dog needs to be walked every day but you can’t always depend upon the weather being cooperative. Rain is one of the most common problems a dog owner encounters when the weather turns bad.

Should your dog be walked in the rain or should you try skipping the dog’s regular walk and just let it outside for a few moments to take care of its biological functions?

Almost every veterinarian will agree that there’s nothing wrong with walking your dog in the rain if you take certain precautions. Sometimes your dog has to go potty and there is no other option.

Most dogs do not appreciate taking a stroll in the rain, particularly if the downpour is heavy. Most humans won’t appreciate it either.

Some dogs do love the rain, especially if they are retrievers or other dog breeds used to water, but most dogs want to avoid the rain and skip the walk. If you really want or need to walk your dog in the rain (if you live in an apartment or home where there is no yard to let the dog out into), you’ll need to make the experience as comfortable as possible for your dog.

If it’s raining and the weather is cold, you’ll need to be sure your dog is protected from the rain as much as possible and remain warm. Excessive exposure to a cold rain can result in hypothermia.

Always ensure your dog stays warm enough if the temperature outside drops to a really cold level.

One of the easiest ways to make it painless for both you and your dog when you have to walk in the rain is to look for areas with shelters that will block the rain. If you can find a covered area or one that has trees that block out some of the rain, it will limit the amount of rain that your dog – and you -have to endure.

If you live where it rains a lot, you might consider purchasing some rain protection for your dog that can make walking in the rain more tolerable for your pet.

Dog rain coats help your dog stay dry in the rain. These coats are usually made from vinyl and are wind-resistant and waterproof, and come with Velcro straps to help keep the coat in place.

Dog rain boots will help keep your dog’s legs and paws from getting wet, although many dogs will refuse to wear them.

Pet umbrellas are not as common but they attach to your dog’s collar and will keep your dog protected from the rain.

After walking your dog in the rain, be sure to dry it off thoroughly using a towel. If you have a long-haired dog you may need to use a hair blower to dry both the top coat and undercoat of your dog.

Deciding whether to walk your dog in the rain is a personal decision, but if done properly and with the right apparel, it can be painless and easy for both of you, and your dog may even learn to enjoy an outing in the rain as much as it does on a dry day.

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