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The #1 source for immediate, long-term relief for dogs suffering from degenerative diseases like hip dysplasia, OCD and arthritis.

We are specialists in the treatment of canine joint disease and its accompanying pain.

Let us help put an end to your dog’s suffering, joint stiffness, pain, immobility, and poor quality of life. Our proven products will help you easily accomplish this without the use of drugs or invasive surgery.

Joint Issues

  • Hip Dysplasia
  • Arthritis
  • Osteochondritis (OCD)
  • Stiffness/Inflammation
  • Ligament Tears
  • Growing Pains
  • Mobility Problems
  • Joint Pain
  • Back/Spinal Problems
  • Hypertrophic Osteodystrophy (HOD)

Symptoms

Is your pet becoming less active, less playful, or desiring shorter walks? The following symptoms could be early signs of OCD, Arthritis or Hip Dysplasia.

  • Moving more slowly
  • Difficulty getting up
  • Weight shift to another leg
  • Personality change
  • Reluctant to walk, jump or play
  • Refuses using stairs or the car
  • Change in appetite
  • Change in behavior
  • Muscle atrophy
  • Lagging behind
  • Yelping when touched
  • Limping
We Can Help!
 

Archive for the ‘Dog Supplements’ Category

Dogs With OCD

Monday, July 11th, 2016

Dogs with OCD (or Osteochondrosis) suffer a great deal of pain and mobility issues.

When a dog has OCD, fragments of bone and cartilage become detached from larger bones and end up floating around the area encompassing a dog’s joints. The result is that any movement in the joint where those fragments are located will cause a dog to suffer from severe pain.

Dogs With OCD (or osteochondrosis)

What is Osteochondrosis (OCD)

OCD is a congenital problem that usually affects only larger dogs who seem to be predisposed to the condition.

The best way to understand the true cause of this condition is that it is a disease of the cartilage that results in large pieces of cartilage and bone becoming detached and floating freely. This causes a dog with OCD a lot of pain.

These free floating bone and cartilage pieces can lead to the development of arthritis, hip dysplasia, secondary degenerative joint disease, or other side effects.

There are several variations of osteochondrosis (OCD), and all typically affect the dog’s joints at the ankle, shoulder, elbow and knee on one or both sides of a dog’s body.

The different types of OCD are distinguished by their location on a dog’s body. They are also differentiated from each other based on the severity and the primary cause of the condition.

It’s more common for OCD to affect the forelimbs than a dog’s hind feet and legs.

Symptoms of OCD in dogs

To properly treat and identify OCD in your pet, you need to be able to recognize the symptoms of this disease. OCD can develop at any stage of a dog’s life, although it is more common in younger dogs than in older ones.

Dogs with OCD will show some of the following warning signs:

  • Pain when the affected limb is touched;
  • Muscle degeneration on the affected side of the dog’s body;
  • A general limitation of movement;
  • Lameness or difficulty moving around.

How to diagnose and treat OCD in dogs

A veterinarian will diagnose osteochondrosis using a series of X-ray tests.

Treatment of the disease requires lifestyle changes. The dog’s exercise routine must be changed to ensure that the dog can remain active and suffer fewer mobility problems.

Dogs suffering with joint diseases like OCD, arthritis, bursitis, hip dysplasia and other degenerative problems with the shoulders, elbows and hocks can find immediate and long-term relief without drugs with a regular regimen of Winston’s Joint System, a combination of three, totally-natural whole food supplements developed by a Naturopathic Doctor for his own dog. Winston’s contains no drugs and there are no side-effects.

Winston’s Pain Formula is another product proven to be fast acting and highly effective in relieving the pain in a dog caused by these diseases. Both of these products help your dog to recover much faster.

Dogs with OCD will require a change in diet and careful observation to prevent overfeeding and weight gain which contribute to damage of the joints due to OCD. Work with your vet to determine if your dog’s diet is properly supporting its joint health or if it can be changed to be more effective.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis and all joint, pain and mobility issues.
 
There is an excellent chance we can help your dog, so please contact us at: www.dogshealth.com or call our toll free number at 888-901-5557.

Why Dogs Vomit Undigested Food

Monday, June 20th, 2016


Dogs vomit undigested food occasionally and if this happens to your pet it shouldn’t be cause for alarm. It’s normal for dogs to vomit sometimes, but if the vomiting is accompanied by diarrhea or bloody stools, the dog should be examined by a vet and treated as soon as possible.

When a dog eats inedible food it can develop gastrointestinal problems resulting in vomiting. This can also occur with a sudden change in diet that a dog’s stomach is unable to handle. Regardless of the cause, most dogs suffering from indigestion will experience a painful contraction of the stomach muscles while trying to force out the undigested matter resulting in vomiting.

Indigestion causes two types of vomiting, acute and chronic. If your dog suddenly throws up after eating something inedible, acute vomiting may ensue. Very seldom will a dog with acute vomiting require medication to stop the vomiting and prevent dehydration. If it is required, a prescription medication will ease the digestive tract and help restore it to normality.

Chronic vomiting can be recognized when a dog continues to throw up undigested food once or twice a week. If this happens, the dog could be suffering from a stomach infection. Dogs with a weak digestive system are predisposed to indigestion, gastrointestinal intolerance and other sicknesses like inflammatory bowel syndrome. A dog with chronic vomiting will often refuse to eat. Chronic vomiting is usually associated with an inflammation of the intestines.

In order to determine the cause of indigestion and understand why a dog vomits undigested food, a series of diagnostic tests will be performed by a veterinarian, including blood tests, abdominal X-rays and an examination of the dog’s feces.

Mild cases of vomiting can easily be treated by changing a dog’s diet. However, if the cause of the vomiting is intestinal inflammation, the vet will usually prescribe drugs after determining the cause of the inflammation.

If a dog returns to normal after vomiting undigested food, there is no need to worry. However, if it exhibits other symptoms along with the vomiting, or if the condition worsens, the dog will need a medical diagnosis.

How To Give Your Dog a Pill

Monday, May 2nd, 2016


If you’ve recently taken your dog to the vet and were given medication to treat an illness or ailment, chances are good that the medication came in the form of a pill. But suppose your dog hates being given a pill because of the taste or for other reasons. If you have an intransigent and uncooperative dog, here are some clues on how to give your dog a pill.

Probably the easiest way to give your dog a pill is to hide it in a piece of its food. If that doesn’t work (and many a dog is smart enough to eat the food and spit out the pill) try putting the pill in a small amount of peanut butter or cream cheese. This usually provides a good incentive for your dog to take the medication without being aware of it. If you decide to put the pill in the dog’s food, feed a small amount of the food separately before inserting the pill.

One mistake some people make is to crush the pill and mix it into the dog’s regular food. The problem with this approach is if the dog doesn’t eat the whole meal, it won’t be getting the benefit of the correct dosage of medication it needs.

If your dog refuses to take the pill in its food or the medication cannot be administered with food, you’ll need to try a different tack to get your pet to take its medicine.

One way is to hold the pill between your thumb and index finger. Holding your dog’s muzzle with the other hand, gently grasp the dog’s muzzle from above, placing your thumb on one side and your fingers on the other side.

Squeeze behind the dog’s upper canine teeth and tilt its head back over the shoulders so it’s looking at the ceiling. This will cause the lower jaw to automatically drop a bit.

Place a finger between the lower canine teeth (the long front teeth) and push down to lower the dog’s bottom jaw.

Quickly put the pill as far back in your dog’s mouth as possible, getting it over the ‘hump’ of the tongue. Be careful not to put your hand in too far or your dog may gag.

Close your dog’s mouth. While holding the mouth closed, lower the head to a normal position to make it easier for your dog to swallow the pill. If your dog will not swallow the pill after this action try rubbing or blowing on your dog’s nose to help stimulate it to swallow the pill.

When your dog finally swallows the pill, praise it and offer a treat. This will make it easier the next time you need to administer a pill.

If this seems too difficult or confusing to you, ask one of the veterinarian staff to demonstrate this method for you. Then when you’re at home and need to give your dog a pill you’ll know exactly what to do.

Can Dogs Eat Frozen Food?

Monday, December 7th, 2015


Frozen dog foods are becoming popular in the pet food world. The major concern for most dog owners is the question, “Can dogs eat frozen food?”

Some dog owners are choosing to purchase commercially prepared raw foods for their pets with choices ranging from turkey, chicken, beef and lamb, to exotic meats like quail, rabbit and antelope.

These fully prepared meals can be made up of only ground meat, or meat with ground up bone and vegetables. The meals that contain only meat use muscle meat as well as organ meats like liver, heart and other organs that wild dogs consume.

If you want to feed your dog a vegetarian diet, there are frozen vegetable mixtures also available on the market.

Dogs are carnivores and they require a diet of raw meat and natural foods that have been prepared with minimal processing. For centuries a dog’s diet was mostly grain-free and contained a multitude of enzymes and antioxidants that dogs today do not get in heat-processed dog food.

To provide the natural proteins, antioxidants, enzymes, vitamins, and minerals a dog needs, raw meat that is free of hormones and antibiotics supplies a dog with the sources for these ingredients.

Many owners find that feeding pre-prepared frozen foods for their dog is a relatively easy way to assure that their pet is receiving the vitamins and minerals necessary to good health.

We recommend you visit one of the following online sites that offer these meals: www.naturesvariety.com, www.stevesrealfood.com, or www.darwinspet.com.

You may also want to consider supplementing one of these prepared raw food diets with raw bones. Meat doesn’t contain a sufficient amount of calcium for a dog’s body, so dogs in the wild receive the bulk of their calcium by consuming bones which provide the additional nutrients a dog needs.

Raw bones should not be cooked. When cooked they become brittle and can break into pieces in your dog’s digestive system. If your dog has a tendency to eat too fast, you can feed it frozen bones that have been slightly thawed. This will force your dog to spend more time eating the bone.

In addition to raw food and bones, many companies sell frozen treats for dogs that look like ice cream tidbits and popsicles that we humans eat. The treats are made from dog-friendly foods like peanut butter, bananas and berries and most dogs find them to be delicious and special snacks.

Dogs can eat frozen foods and will usually like them.

If you’re interested in feeding your dog raw foods you can visit one of the raw pet food sites listed above, or start out by buying fresh raw meat at your grocers and begin feeding your dog small amounts of meat to see if it can easily digest it.

Hip Dysplasia in Shih Tzus

Monday, November 30th, 2015

Hip Dysplasia in Shih Tzus is not as common as it is in larger breed dogs. However, the sad fact is that all sizes of dogs and many breeds are susceptible to this debilitating disease.

Hip Dysplasia in a Shih Tzu

Shih Tzus

Shih Tzus are lively and energetic little companions, but are low-keyed and easily satisfied.

They like nothing better than to be held, petted, and pampered by their owners, and are perfectly happy sitting on the couch with their owner for hours.

Their personality ranges from arrogance and haughtiness at times, to courageousness and politeness at other times.

A Shih Tzu makes a good family dog and adapts well to both children and adults, but they’re not particularly good with very young children as they can’t be handled roughly or awkwardly and they tend to get snappy when their patience wears thin.

They adapt well to apartment living, and while they don’t require as much exercise as large active dogs, daily walks are necessary.

They do make alert and reliable watchdogs, barking vigorously when anyone comes close to their house.

Shih Tzus require more care than other breeds if their hair is kept long. They need daily brushing and regular haircuts but they shed very little, making them a perfect pet choice for anyone who suffers from allergies.

The Shih Tzu is one of the world’s oldest dog breeds. Chinese paintings from the 6th century A.D. show Shi Tzu-like dogs, and historical records note that they were kept as house pets during the Ming Dynasty.

Shih Tzus have long flowing hair, including a tuft of hair above the nose that gives them their characteristic “chrysanthemum” face.

Their rounded heads have a long beard and moustache, a short muzzle and a black nose. Most Shih Tzus have round, dark, wide-set eyes with hanging ears covered with hair. They are longer than they are tall, and their tail curls over the back.

A healthy Shih Tzu can live as long as 15 years. Common health issues include ear and kidney infections, eye problems, and hip dysplasia.

Hip Dysplasia in Shih Tzus

Hip dysplasia is a genetic disease that primarily affects large and giant breeds of dogs but can also affect medium-sized breeds and occasionally small breeds. It is primarily a disease of purebreds, although it can also occur in mixed breeds.

To understand hip dysplasia in Shih Tzus and the resulting arthritis, you need a basic understanding of how the dog’s hip joint is affected.

The hip joint is comprised of a ball and socket that forms the attachment of the hind leg to the body. The ball portion is the head of the femur and the socket is located on the pelvis.

In a normal hip joint the ball rotates freely within the socket. The bones are shaped to perfectly match each other with the socket surrounding the ball. To strengthen the joint, the two bones are held together by a strong ligament.

The joint capsule, a strong band of connective tissue, circles the two bones to provide added stability.

What a normal hip joint looks like:

normal hip joint

Hip dysplasia is linked to abnormal joint structure and a laxity of the muscles, connective tissue, and ligaments that would normally support the dog’s hip joints.

As the disease progresses, the articular surfaces of the two bones lose contact with each other. This separation of the two bones within the joint causes a drastic change in the size and shape of the articular surfaces.

What an abnormal hip joint looks like:

hip dysplasia joint

Most Shih Tzus who eventually develop hip dysplasia are born with normal hips, but due to their genetic make-up the soft tissues surrounding the joint develop abnormally. This leads to the symptoms associated with hip dysplasia. The disease may affect both hips, or only the right or left hip.

Hip dysplasia in Shih Tzus will cause afflicted dogs to walk or run with an altered gait, similar to a bunny-hop. The dog begins to resist any movement that requires full extension or flexion of the rear legs. It will experience stiffness and pain in the rear legs after exercising and on first rising in the morning. Climbing stairs becomes difficult if not impossible. Some dogs will limp and are less willing to participate in normal daily activities, including walks they formerly enjoyed.

It appears that the amount of calories a dog consumes, especially during its fast-growth period from three to ten months, has the biggest impact on whether or not a dog genetically prone to hip dysplasia will develop the disease.

Obesity can increase the severity of the disease in dogs that are genetically susceptible and the extra weight will intensify the degeneration of a dog’s joints and hips. Dogs who are genetically prone to hip dysplasia and also are overweight, are at a much higher risk of developing hip dysplasia and eventually arthritis.

Exercise can be another risk factor. Dogs genetically susceptible to hip dysplasia may have an increased incidence of the disease if they are over-exercised at a young age. Moderate exercise like running and swimming is best for exercising young dogs.

Treatment

Because hip dysplasia in Shih Tzus is primarily an inherited condition, there are no products that can prevent its development.

Through proper diet, exercise, and a daily regimen of Winston’s Joint System, you can slow, and sometimes halt, the progression of this degenerative joint disease while providing your dog with relief from its pain. Winston’s provides many of the raw materials essential for the synthesis of the joint-lubricating synovial fluid as well as the repair of articular cartilage and connective tissue.

You might also want to consider providing your dog with an orthopedic bed like the Canine Cooler Bed which distributes the dog’s weight evenly and reduces pressure on its joints. The Canine Cooler Bed uses revolutionary SoothSoft Technology to give your dog the very best in comfort, and the fluid-enhanced design offers a dry, cooling effect with superior cushioning and support. It’s perfect for dogs with hip dysplasia or arthritis.

If owners insisted on only purchasing an animal whose parents and grandparents were certified to have good or excellent hips, and if breeders only bred these first-rate animals, then the majority of the problems caused by hip dysplasia would be eliminated.

If you are looking to purchase a Shih Tzu now or in the future, the best way to lessen the possibility of getting a dog that will develop hip dysplasia is to examine the incidence of the disease in the dog’s lineage. If at all possible, try to examine the parents and grandparents as far back as three or four generations.

There are different assumptions on how to prevent the progression of hip dysplasia in Shih Tzus.

Poor nutrition, inadequate or improper exercise, and increased body weight may all contribute to the severity of osteoarthritis after the hip dysplasia has developed. Watching the calories your puppy or young dog consumes and preventing obesity in your dog, allowing only non-stressful types of exercise, and a daily regimen of Winston’s Joint System, are the best things you can do for your dog.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis and all joint, pain and mobility issues.
 
There is an excellent chance we can help your dog, so please contact us at: www.dogshealth.com or call our toll free number at 888-901-5557.

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