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The #1 source for immediate, long-term relief for dogs suffering from degenerative diseases like hip dysplasia, OCD and arthritis.

We are specialists in the treatment of canine joint disease and its accompanying pain.

Let us help put an end to your dog’s suffering, joint stiffness, pain, immobility, and poor quality of life. Our proven products will help you easily accomplish this without the use of drugs or invasive surgery.

Joint Issues

  • Hip Dysplasia
  • Arthritis
  • Osteochondritis (OCD)
  • Stiffness/Inflammation
  • Ligament Tears
  • Growing Pains
  • Mobility Problems
  • Joint Pain
  • Back/Spinal Problems
  • Hypertrophic Osteodystrophy (HOD)

Symptoms

Is your pet becoming less active, less playful, or desiring shorter walks? The following symptoms could be early signs of OCD, Arthritis or Hip Dysplasia.

  • Moving more slowly
  • Difficulty getting up
  • Weight shift to another leg
  • Personality change
  • Reluctant to walk, jump or play
  • Refuses using stairs or the car
  • Change in appetite
  • Change in behavior
  • Muscle atrophy
  • Lagging behind
  • Yelping when touched
  • Limping
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Archive for the ‘Dog Treats and Snacks’ Category

Shih Tzu Care Tips

Monday, July 25th, 2016


Shih tzu’s are good-natured and easy to train, making them great family pets. But caring for a Shih tzu can be time consuming because they require a lot of grooming.

A major part of Shih tzu care is proper grooming which will begin as soon as you bring your new dog home. Their thick, double-coated hair can be grown long, or for easier care, kept in a short cut.

As soon as you bring your Shih tzu home it’s a good idea to start desensitizing your pet to brushing since it will need to be brushed daily. Start with a quick brushing, being careful not to get too forceful with the first few brushings.

During grooming sessions you’ll need to lift the top coat of its hair and brush the undercoat thoroughly. Be sure to brush its stomach, under the ears and between its legs where hair mats are particularly likely to collect.

Good Shih tzu care includes keeping the hair trimmed from their eyes, or in lieu of trimming you can use a special dog rubber band to place the hair in a ponytail on top of the dog’s head. These ribbons are available from almost every pet store.

Since shih tzus have floppy ears, you will need to clean their ears regularly using a special ear cleaner or mild soap. Use a cotton ball or something equally as soft to clean the ear flaps; then use a Q-Tip to clean the part of its ear canal that you can easily see. Take special care not to clean too far inside the ear canal or you can easily damage its ear drum.

Because they have flat faces, Shih tzus often have difficulty eating and drinking. It’s a good idea to supervise your dog when it’s eating or drinking water from its bowls. It helps if you put their food and water in wide, flat pans to make it easier for them to get their whole face in the bowl. Some owners prefer to hand feed their pet to make it easier for the dog to eat.

Shih tzus need regular exercise but usually can’t handle long walks. Shorter exercise periods once or twice a day is better for these little dogs. In the summer you should keep the walks shorter as Shih tzus don’t tolerate heat very well.

Shih tzus are very playful dogs and they enjoy short stretches of play. If you teach your Shih tzu to fetch a toy or play hide and seek, it will provide enough exercise for your pet and also allow it to rest when tired.

Although Shih tzu care can involve high maintenance, these dogs make a great addition to a family as long as you’re prepared for the effort it takes to keep them safe and well-groomed.

Why Dogs Vomit Undigested Food

Monday, June 20th, 2016


Dogs vomit undigested food occasionally and if this happens to your pet it shouldn’t be cause for alarm. It’s normal for dogs to vomit sometimes, but if the vomiting is accompanied by diarrhea or bloody stools, the dog should be examined by a vet and treated as soon as possible.

When a dog eats inedible food it can develop gastrointestinal problems resulting in vomiting. This can also occur with a sudden change in diet that a dog’s stomach is unable to handle. Regardless of the cause, most dogs suffering from indigestion will experience a painful contraction of the stomach muscles while trying to force out the undigested matter resulting in vomiting.

Indigestion causes two types of vomiting, acute and chronic. If your dog suddenly throws up after eating something inedible, acute vomiting may ensue. Very seldom will a dog with acute vomiting require medication to stop the vomiting and prevent dehydration. If it is required, a prescription medication will ease the digestive tract and help restore it to normality.

Chronic vomiting can be recognized when a dog continues to throw up undigested food once or twice a week. If this happens, the dog could be suffering from a stomach infection. Dogs with a weak digestive system are predisposed to indigestion, gastrointestinal intolerance and other sicknesses like inflammatory bowel syndrome. A dog with chronic vomiting will often refuse to eat. Chronic vomiting is usually associated with an inflammation of the intestines.

In order to determine the cause of indigestion and understand why a dog vomits undigested food, a series of diagnostic tests will be performed by a veterinarian, including blood tests, abdominal X-rays and an examination of the dog’s feces.

Mild cases of vomiting can easily be treated by changing a dog’s diet. However, if the cause of the vomiting is intestinal inflammation, the vet will usually prescribe drugs after determining the cause of the inflammation.

If a dog returns to normal after vomiting undigested food, there is no need to worry. However, if it exhibits other symptoms along with the vomiting, or if the condition worsens, the dog will need a medical diagnosis.

What Should a Dog Eat?

Monday, June 6th, 2016


What should a dog eat and how do you know if you’re giving your pet the best diet possible? There are so many different types of diets available for dogs today – dry food, canned food, raw meats, cooked meats, turkey, vegetables, and specialty blends.

The diet that you feed your dog will have an effect on its physical health, its weight, and the luster and health of its coat. If the diet you feed your dog lacks in needed vitamins and minerals, your dog can become restless, irritable, and tire easily. Certain foods can also cause dogs to become overly excited or nervous.

To be sure your dog is eating the healthiest diet possible, you need the right combination of vitamins and minerals as well as the right amounts of protein and carbohydrates.

Should a dog eat meat? Humans don’t need to eat meat to stay healthy but dogs do. A nutritious, well-balanced dog food should contain approximately 40% meat (to provide the protein), 50% vegetables, and 10% carbohydrates. If a dog’s diet is lacking in sufficient amounts of protein it can cause weight loss, muscle wasting and slow growth in younger dogs. A diet lacking in vegetables can lead to vitamin deficiencies, and carbohydrates are important to keep a dog’s thyroid functioning properly.

To maintain a healthy balance of the essential vitamins, minerals, and amino acids a dog needs for optimum health, select a dog food that contains vitamins A, D, E, and K, as well as Vitamin B1, B6, and B12, riboflavin, niacin, pantothenic acid, folic acid and choline.

There are twelve minerals that are critical to a dog’s health. These minerals are calcium, phosphorus, zinc, magnesium, Iodine, sodium, potassium, copper, chlorine, iron, manganese and selenium.

In addition, there are ten important amino acids dogs obtain from the food they eat that are necessary for correct body functioning. These amino acids are arginine, histidine, threonine, tryptophan, lysine, methionine, leucine, phenyalanine, valine and isoleucine. A dog needs these essential amino acids to build strong muscles and to control nerve impulses in its body.

A dog that does not receive sufficient vitamins, minerals and amino acids in its diet is susceptible to weakness, joint pain, gastrointestinal symptoms, increased heart rate, and enlargement of the thyroid gland.

There are other side effects of poor nutrition due to vitamin and mineral deficiencies. A deficiency in vitamin A can cause central nervous system depression and a deficiency of vitamin D can cause fatigue or exhaustion. A sodium deficiency can cause restlessness and a magnesium deficiency can cause irritability.

The best type of dog food your dog should eat is a high-quality, all-natural dog food containing adequate amounts of vitamins, minerals, and essential amino acids. A nutritious dog food should not contain by-products or synthetic additives. Buy the best food you can afford for your dog and you may enjoy many more years together.

How to Stop A Puppy From Barking

Monday, May 9th, 2016


Stopping a puppy from barking can be a difficult task, simply because barking is a natural form of communication for puppies. Puppies bark for many reasons: attention seeking, anxiety, boredom or just playing. Puppies and barking are a natural combination.

If you can establish the reasons why a puppy is barking so much, it will be easier to find a solution to the problem.

To figure out why your puppy is barking uncontrollably you first need to determine the situations or conditions that precede an episode of barking. If your puppy is barking at you, it’s usually trying to get your attention. If this is the case, just ignore it and avoid eye contact. When the puppy stops barking you can shower it with all the attention you want.

Don’t talk to your puppy while it’s barking at you and don’t relent and give in if the barking continues. If you do give in, the undesirable behavior will be implanted in the puppy’s brain as the best way to get your attention whenever it wants something.

If a puppy continues to bark while standing over its food bowl it’s just letting you know that it’s guarding its food. Puppies who bark for no discernible reason may simply be frustrated or bored.

If left alone, a puppy often becomes anxious and will bark continuously until its human returns. If you find out that your puppy barks a lot while you’re gone from the house it could be anxious about being alone, it could be bored, or there may be something disturbing it like dogs barking outside or noisy cars and trucks.

If you make your puppy’s surroundings more interesting the unwelcome barking may end. You can also give your puppy different toys to play with every few days, and be sure it gets a lot of exercise. If the puppy barks a lot and seems bored when you’re home try spending a little more time playing with it and giving it the attention it craves.

Stopping a puppy from barking too much will help calm shattered nerves, whether they’re yours or the next door neighbor’s.

How To Give Your Dog a Pill

Monday, May 2nd, 2016


If you’ve recently taken your dog to the vet and were given medication to treat an illness or ailment, chances are good that the medication came in the form of a pill. But suppose your dog hates being given a pill because of the taste or for other reasons. If you have an intransigent and uncooperative dog, here are some clues on how to give your dog a pill.

Probably the easiest way to give your dog a pill is to hide it in a piece of its food. If that doesn’t work (and many a dog is smart enough to eat the food and spit out the pill) try putting the pill in a small amount of peanut butter or cream cheese. This usually provides a good incentive for your dog to take the medication without being aware of it. If you decide to put the pill in the dog’s food, feed a small amount of the food separately before inserting the pill.

One mistake some people make is to crush the pill and mix it into the dog’s regular food. The problem with this approach is if the dog doesn’t eat the whole meal, it won’t be getting the benefit of the correct dosage of medication it needs.

If your dog refuses to take the pill in its food or the medication cannot be administered with food, you’ll need to try a different tack to get your pet to take its medicine.

One way is to hold the pill between your thumb and index finger. Holding your dog’s muzzle with the other hand, gently grasp the dog’s muzzle from above, placing your thumb on one side and your fingers on the other side.

Squeeze behind the dog’s upper canine teeth and tilt its head back over the shoulders so it’s looking at the ceiling. This will cause the lower jaw to automatically drop a bit.

Place a finger between the lower canine teeth (the long front teeth) and push down to lower the dog’s bottom jaw.

Quickly put the pill as far back in your dog’s mouth as possible, getting it over the ‘hump’ of the tongue. Be careful not to put your hand in too far or your dog may gag.

Close your dog’s mouth. While holding the mouth closed, lower the head to a normal position to make it easier for your dog to swallow the pill. If your dog will not swallow the pill after this action try rubbing or blowing on your dog’s nose to help stimulate it to swallow the pill.

When your dog finally swallows the pill, praise it and offer a treat. This will make it easier the next time you need to administer a pill.

If this seems too difficult or confusing to you, ask one of the veterinarian staff to demonstrate this method for you. Then when you’re at home and need to give your dog a pill you’ll know exactly what to do.

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