Our Blog
The #1 source for immediate, long-term relief for dogs suffering from degenerative diseases like hip dysplasia, OCD and arthritis.

We are specialists in the treatment of canine joint disease and its accompanying pain.

Let us help put an end to your dog’s suffering, joint stiffness, pain, immobility, and poor quality of life. Our proven products will help you easily accomplish this without the use of drugs or invasive surgery.

Joint Issues

  • Hip Dysplasia
  • Arthritis
  • Osteochondritis (OCD)
  • Stiffness/Inflammation
  • Ligament Tears
  • Growing Pains
  • Mobility Problems
  • Joint Pain
  • Back/Spinal Problems
  • Hypertrophic Osteodystrophy (HOD)

Symptoms

Is your pet becoming less active, less playful, or desiring shorter walks? The following symptoms could be early signs of OCD, Arthritis or Hip Dysplasia.

  • Moving more slowly
  • Difficulty getting up
  • Weight shift to another leg
  • Personality change
  • Reluctant to walk, jump or play
  • Refuses using stairs or the car
  • Change in appetite
  • Change in behavior
  • Muscle atrophy
  • Lagging behind
  • Yelping when touched
  • Limping
We Can Help!
 

Archive for the ‘Dog Vaccines’ Category

Dog Sinus Infections

Monday, September 28th, 2015


A dog’s sinus cavities are located between its nasal cavities and skull. When a dog develops an upper respiratory tract infection it is also at risk of contracting a sinus infection.

When a dog has a sinus infection, the sinuses become inflamed and congested with fluid. This condition is often caused by fungal, viral or bacterial infection. A dog who is suffering from an upper respiratory tract infection is at the highest risk for falling victim to a sinus infection.

Insect bites or stings can also develop into a sinus infection. If a dog is overly exposed to smoke, dust, pollen or mold, its sinuses can become inflamed and lead to infection. In older dogs, health problems like abscessed teeth can often result in sinus infection.

When a dog develops a sinus infection it will sneeze often and may gag or cough. Its eyes and nose may begin to water and if the infection becomes severe, it could lead to bleeding from the nose.

A clear discharge from the eyes and nose usually is indicative of an allergy that may be due to inhaled dust or other irritants.

Dog sinus infections are often symptoms of a lesser upper respiratory tract infection or the common cold. But if the sinus symptoms last longer than two days it would be wise to make an appointment with a veterinarian.

Immediate emergency vet care is absolutely necessary if a dog develops a nosebleed. A dog with sinus infections can suffer from nosebleeds, but if they are severe, they usually are an indicator of a more serious condition.

The vet will do a complete physical exam and detailed medical history before being able to positively diagnose a dog’s sinus infection. The vet will closely examine the dog’s eyes and nose and take X-rays or an ultrasound to determine the degree of congestion.

Medication is usually prescribed to treat a dog’s sinus infection. If the vet determines that bacteria is responsible for the infection, the dog will be prescribed an antibiotic. If a fungus is responsible for the infection, anti-fungal medications will be prescribed rather than an antibiotic. If the dog’s sinus infection is viral, no medications will cure it and the infection is left to run its course.

If a dog comes down with a sinus infection it’s recommended that it stay inside the house and not go outside if it’s raining or cold. The dog should be kept as warm and dry as possible.

Ringworm Infections in Dogs

Monday, August 31st, 2015


There are several types of fungal skin infections in dogs, each having a different cause. It is not difficult for a dog to contract a fungal infection from dirt, other infected dogs, and even from another dog’s feces. Ringworm is the most common type of fungal infection affecting a dog’s skin. This infection is not caused by “worms” as its name implies but is caused by fungi. The name “ringworm” derives from the appearance of a dog’s skin which develops red circles and hair loss when infected.

A ringworm infection can easily be transmitted to humans and should be treated as soon as it appears on a dog’s skin. Never touch these sores with your bare hands, instead always wear gloves when handling a dog infected with ringworms.

Several different fungi can cause ringworm. The ringworm fungus is most prevalent in hot, humid climates even though most cases of ringworm occur in the fall and winter.

Ringworm infection can be transmitted by direct contact with the lesions of another infected dog or by contact with a surface contaminated with the spores such as grooming equipment or brushes. Ringworm spores can survive for long periods in the environment, making it possible for a dog to contract ringworm just about anywhere other dogs or cats have been. Young dogs are most often infected, and dogs with a suppressed immune system caused by other diseases or overuse of steroids, are also more susceptible to contracting the disease.

Most healthy adult dogs have some resistance to ringworm and will never develop symptoms from the fungus.

Dogs with ringworm often display a distinctive set of symptoms, most often a small round lesion without hair. The lesion will often have scaly skin in the center and sometimes small abscesses appear in the lesion. The lesion may start as a small spot and continue to grow in size and it may or may not be irritated and itchy. The lesions are most common on the head but can also occur on a dog’s legs, feet, or tail.

The best and most accurate way to identify a ringworm infection is by collecting scales and crust from the dog’s skin and coat and have them cultured by a veterinarian.

Most small, isolated lesions on healthy dogs and puppies will heal on their own within 4 months. In more severe cases, several different treatments are used. Isolated lesions can be treated with an antifungal medication such as miconazole cream, Lotrimin cream, or 1% chlorhexidine ointment which need to be applied to the infected areas twice a day. More severe lesions need to be treated with antifungal shampoos such as 0.5% chlorhexidine shampoo, ketoconazole shampoo, 2% chlorhexidine solution, or 2% miconazole shampoo applied every two to four days.

There are currently no dependable vaccines to prevent ringworm infection in dogs.

Dog Vaccines

Monday, February 23rd, 2015


The list of vaccines to prevent common dog viruses contains only seven vaccines. Each of these vaccines can be used to protect against one or more viruses that can affect a dog.

Vaccines contain a viral or bacterial agent that is added to a liquid and then given to a dog through ingestion, inhalation or injection. This causes a dog’s immune system to create antibodies to a specific illness and will protect the dog from infection if exposed to that virus.

Each of the vaccines listed below refers to the level and type of the virus or bacteria in the vaccine, and the level and type of protection a dog will acquire after receiving the vaccine.

1. Monovalent Vaccines
Monovalent vaccines provide protection for one disease at a time. An example of this is the Rabies vaccine. This vaccine contains only the rabies viral agent added to the liquid.

2. Multivalent Vaccines
Multivalent vaccines contain several bacterial or viral agents that have been added to the liquid the dog will ingest. As many as 8 or 9 disease agents can be combined into one Multivalent vaccine. A common vaccine called Duramune is known as a “core vaccine” and protects against four of the most common dog viruses.

3. Recombinant Vaccines
Certain antigens on infectious organisms stimulate a greater antibody response in a dog. In a Recombinant vaccine the genes of the virus are fragmented into separate parts and the parts that will produce the best immune response are isolated and used in the vaccine.

4. Injectable Vaccines
Injectable vaccines are injected into a dog’s muscle or under the skin. When injected in the dog’s muscle it is referred to as an intramuscular vaccine and if injected under the skin it is called a subcutaneous vaccine. Some vaccines can be injected using either method but some such as the rabies vaccine must be injected intramuscularly.

5. Modified Live Vaccines (MLV)
In Modified Live Vaccines, live virus particles are altered in a laboratory to keep the virus alive but kill its ability to produce the disease. When introduced to the dog’s body, the viral agents reproduce and trigger an immune response without causing an outbreak of the infection. MLV vaccines stimulate a dog’s antibodies more quickly and in larger amounts.

6. Killed Vaccines
In a Killed vaccine, the actual viruses or bacteria are killed and then placed in a liquid solution. The viruses or bacteria are then not able to multiply within a dog’s body. More of the virus or bacteria particles are introduced in an attempt to trigger an immune response. There is one disadvantage to this type of vaccine and that is it can put a dog at an increased risk of developing an allergic response.

7. Intranasal Vaccines
Intranasal vaccines are designed to protect against diseases of a dog’s respiratory system. They are processed into a liquid to squirt or drop into a dog’s nose. The vaccine is transmitted directly into the dog’s bloodstream and provides protection more quickly than an injectable vaccine can.

It is important that you consult your veterinarian to determine which vaccines are appropriate for your pet and when they should be administered.

Why Do Dogs Chew Their Paws?

Monday, December 8th, 2014


Dogs enjoy chewing on lots of things, including their own paws at times. But why do dogs chew their paws?

If a dog has an emotional problem like separation anxiety, it may chew on its paws. Stress is also one of the major causes of why dogs chew their paws and this stress can be triggered by a past event or a continuing irritant in a dog’s environment.

Some of the most common reasons for a dog to be stressed are listed below:
(1) A new person arrives in the family, like a newborn baby, and the dog is frequently ignored;
(2) A new pet is brought into the household;
(3) Abusive behavior by the current dog owner or by a previous owner;
(4) Separation from its owner or abandonment (this can result in separation anxiety and cause a dog to chew on its paws and skin);
(5) A serious lack of affection from the dog’s owners.

There are other factors that can trigger severe stress in a dog and cause it to chew on its paws; but whatever the cause, it’s important to identify it and work to change that motivation as quickly as possible. Once the dog feels comfortable and safe, the chewing on its paws should end.

It’s also possible and quite likely, that dogs who are bored or dogs with too much energy will find a way to occupy their time, and that usually results in destructive behavior, of which chewing their paws is just one example. You can help change this unwanted behavior by making sure your dog gets plenty of exercise and attention.

Chewing the paws can also be a reaction to a skin infection caused by a virus, bacteria or fungi. The dog will try to soothe the itching by licking and chewing at its skin. A vet can prescribe antibiotics to eliminate the skin infection and once the dog has healthy skin again it will usually stop chewing its paws.

An allergic reaction also causes dogs to chew their paws. These allergies could be caused by food or something the dog has inhaled. Antihistamines or steroid creams will ease the itchiness, but you’ll need to determine what the dog is allergic to and eliminate the dog’s access to that product or thing causing the adverse reaction.

Why Dogs Foam at the Mouth

Monday, October 27th, 2014


There are many reasons dogs foam at the mouth but the first thought that usually comes to most people’s minds when they see a dog foaming at the mouth is – RABIES! Fortunately, this is rarely the cause. In areas of the world where dogs are routinely vaccinated for rabies, the spread of canine rabies is at a very low level.

    Some of the reasons a dog may foam at the mouth include:

When dogs are playing hard and exerting a lot of energy they often salivate heavily which may look like they’re foaming at the mouth. As a dog expends more energy or effort, its breathing becomes rapid and the air it breathes turns the saliva into a froth or foam.

Stress or anxiety can also cause a dog to foam at the mouth. Drooling is not the same as foaming at the mouth. However, if a dog becomes highly stressed or anxious, the dog’s drool combined with its rapid breathing can build up foam around the mouth.

If a dog bites or eats something that leaves a nasty taste in its mouth, it may salivate and pant, creating foam that stays around its mouth. If a dog becomes nauseous it can also salivate and pant, creating foam around its mouth.

A dog who is having difficulty swallowing something may also foam at the mouth. If a dog is experiencing a lot of difficulty swallowing, it may also be having difficulty breathing. This is a condition for a veterinarian to check as soon as possible.

If a dog ingests a poison it may foam at the mouth. If you suspect your dog may have been poisoned it’s critical to get it to the veterinarian immediately to prevent permanent damage or death.

Seizures will cause a dog to foam at the mouth. The seizure itself causes a dog to salivate and pant very rapidly which creates foam around its mouth. In this case there is no need to worry about the foaming but the dog may need to be prescribed an anti-seizure medication.

If a dog does develop rabies it will foam at the mouth and display erratic behavior. Instead of the erratic behavior lasting a short time, the dog will be exhibiting the behavior and will foam at the mouth most of the time.

The length of time that dogs foam at the mouth varies in longer or shorter durations and severity. A dog who foams at the mouth during an excitable playtime will resume normal breathing and the foam will disappear once the exertion ends.

While foaming at the mouth is not usually a serious matter, if your dog is having other distressing symptoms you should see your veterinarian as soon as possible to protect your dog’s health.

© 2010-2015 DogsHealth.Com