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The #1 source for immediate, long-term relief for dogs suffering from degenerative diseases like hip dysplasia, OCD and arthritis.

We are specialists in the treatment of canine joint disease and its accompanying pain.

Let us help put an end to your dog’s suffering, joint stiffness, pain, immobility, and poor quality of life. Our proven products will help you easily accomplish this without the use of drugs or invasive surgery.

Joint Issues

  • Hip Dysplasia
  • Arthritis
  • Osteochondritis (OCD)
  • Stiffness/Inflammation
  • Ligament Tears
  • Growing Pains
  • Mobility Problems
  • Joint Pain
  • Back/Spinal Problems
  • Hypertrophic Osteodystrophy (HOD)

Symptoms

Is your pet becoming less active, less playful, or desiring shorter walks? The following symptoms could be early signs of OCD, Arthritis or Hip Dysplasia.

  • Moving more slowly
  • Difficulty getting up
  • Weight shift to another leg
  • Personality change
  • Reluctant to walk, jump or play
  • Refuses using stairs or the car
  • Change in appetite
  • Change in behavior
  • Muscle atrophy
  • Lagging behind
  • Yelping when touched
  • Limping
We Can Help!
 

Archive for the ‘Medium Dogs Breed’ Category

Dominant Dogs

Monday, September 14th, 2015


Dominant dog behavior usually develops over a period of time. Dominant dogs will often growl or bark at their owners when the dog’s demands aren’t being met.

If there are two or more dogs living in the same household, the dominant dog will be considered by the other dogs as the alpha dog, or leader of the pack. Such dominating dogs often try to gain leadership over their owners also.

To prevent this type of unwanted behavior you must learn how to recognize dominant dog behaviors and take steps to change those behaviors if you want to have an obedient and loving companion rather than a terrorizing monster running around your house.

Some of the symptoms of dominant behavior in dogs are similar to the symptoms of separation anxiety so it is important to distinguish between the two. To determine if your dog is really showing signs of dominating behavior you’ll have to find a way to monitor its behavior to see if it behaves in a dominating manner around other dogs or only when left alone.

If you notice any of the following symptoms of dominating dog behavior you may want to seek the assistance of a professional trainer who can train your dog to be more obedient. If you find that your dog’s disobedience and dominant behavior is resulting in biting and aggression, most trainers won’t work with your dog.

Some of the signs of dominant dogs are:
Always acting stubborn, barking loudly, consistently ignoring your commands, pushing ahead of you whenever you open a door in the house or to the outside, resistance to being walked with a leash, growling and barking when it doesn’t get its way or when corrected for doing something wrong.

It isn’t easy dealing with dominant dogs. If your dog disobeys you and growls at you when you try to correct it, don’t shout or express frustration. You have to remain calm and speak to it in a firm commanding tone.

Although it can be a daunting and challenging task to permanently change the behavior of a dominant dog, it is possible to successfully change your pet’s behavior if you remain calm and persistent at all times during any training sessions.

Health Problems in Older Dogs

Monday, September 7th, 2015

Owners of older dogs face special challenges in keeping their pets healthy. This necessitates remaining attentive to all the signs and symptoms of health problems in older dogs if you want to keep your pet healthy for as long as possible.

Health Problems in Older Dogs

Dogs are considered to have reached old age by the last third of the typical lifespan for their breed.

If you notice that your senior dog seems to have less energy than it used to, it’s simply due to a natural slowing of the dog’s metabolism.

Older dogs are at an increased risk of developing diseases in their later years. Common health problems in older dogs include arthritis, hip dysplasia, congestive heart failure, and kidney failure.

If you’ve allowed your dog to become obese or seriously overweight, it places extra stress on the dog and worsens all of these conditions. Therefore, it’s important to maintain an older dog’s ideal weight by combining the right diet and sufficient exercise.

Older dogs are more accident-prone than younger dogs, so it’s imperative that you help your dog prevent falling over objects in the house or yard. Also watch for large cracks and uplifted areas of sidewalks when taking your dog for a walk.

Health problems in older dogs

Three of the most serious health problems in older dogs are:

Arthritis and Hip Dysplasia
Arthritis usually worsens with age or may not develop until a dog is older. The disease causes significant joint pain and stiffness in dogs. A dog suffering from arthritis will experience impaired mobility and will limp or have difficulty running and climbing stairs.

Hip dysplasia is an abnormality of the hip joint and is one of the main causes of severe arthritis.

Regular non-strenuous exercise, combined with nutritional supplements like Winston’s Joint System, will help lessen the pain and discomfort caused by arthritis and hip dysplasia. Winston’s was designed to help dogs suffering with joint diseases like arthritis, bursitis, osteochondrosis (OCD), hip dysplasia and other degenerative problems obtain long-term relief without drugs.

Winston’s Pain Formula is an excellent addition to help ease a dog’s pain and discomfort. This powerful and natural pain relief product is fast-acting and highly effective. It works exceptionally well with Winston’s Joint System to help a dog recover much faster.

It’s also important that an obese or overweight dog lose weight to help take the pressure off its stressed joints caused by the arthritis or hip dysplasia.

Sleeping can also be a problem when the pain of arthritis or hip dysplasia is severe. To ease the pain in your dog, I recommend using the Canine Cooler Bed to soothe your dog’s inflammation and painful joints. It has really helped my older dog and he loves his bed.

Congestive Heart Failure
Congestive heart failure is a painful condition that can affect a dog at any age, but older and overweight dogs are more apt to succumb to this disease. Dogs with congestive heart failure accumulate fluid in their lung and chest cavities because their weakened heart can no longer efficiently pump their blood.

The symptoms of congestive heart failure include coughing, difficulty breathing, bluish tongue and gums, dizzy spells, sudden fatigue, a potbellied-looking abdomen, and weight loss. There is no cure for this disease and treatment consists only of drug therapy and vitamin supplements.

Your dog will need to be fed foods low in sodium and high in protein. Regular exercise is also very important. Should your dog collapse during exercise or any other activity, seek medical attention immediately as this is an emergency situation.

Kidney Failure
Aging usually impairs kidney function in dogs and can result in kidney failure.

Chronic kidney disease sometimes goes undetected for years. You should be alert to the symptoms of kidney disease which include excessive thirst, excessive urination, weight loss, and fatigue.

Being proactive about health problems in older dogs

Keeping your dog healthy becomes very important when it reaches old age. Graying hair and irritability are common in senior dogs but never assume that physical and behavioral changes are simply due to old age.

Keeping track of your dog’s illness symptoms, staying on schedule for its check-up appointments, and providing preventative care will help keep your dog feeling and acting younger.

Being proactive about your dog’s health will directly impact its life expectancy and ensure that any disease can be diagnosed at its beginning and treated in the early stages, improving the odds for recovery, or at least a more comfortable existence for you beloved pet as it ages.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis and all joint, pain and mobility issues.
 
There is an excellent chance we can help your dog, so please contact us at: www.dogshealth.com or call our toll free number at 888-901-5557.

How to be a Pet Groomer

Monday, July 20th, 2015


Are you thinking about starting a career as a pet groomer? Pet grooming is ideal for people who love animals, but make no bones about it, a career in the pet grooming business can be difficult to get started in. But once you’ve established yourself as a qualified and experienced groomer it can be a very rewarding career and a lot of fun working with dogs of all sizes and types of coats.

To become a successful pet groomer you’ll need to enroll in a professional grooming school. These schools can be found in the yellow pages of your local directory, or for quicker searching use the internet. Professional schools provide their students with the tools, techniques and skills needed to break into the pet grooming profession.

It may surprise you to know that many people who work as dog groomers haven’t attended a professional school, but instead learned the grooming procedures and techniques by taking correspondence courses or night classes at their local college.

As a new dog groomer just starting in the business, it helps to get a job with an established grooming shop as a trainee or assistant. Working for a good dog grooming service will provide you with hands-on experience and the additional training needed to assist you in propelling your career forward in the pet grooming business.

There are many different breeds of dogs, all requiring special techniques for proper grooming. As a dog groomer you’ll have to know how to groom every breed of dog. For example, the grooming style of a Golden Retriever is very different than that of a Yorkie.

When you have been trained and are starting your career, you can ask friends and family if they will let you practice your grooming skills on their pet dogs at no cost to them. This will help you in improving your skills and your friends and family will probably be eager to give you a good reference when you’re searching for the right place in which to begin your career.

When you’re finally ready to be a pet groomer and you feel comfortable enough to proudly say so, you can choose whether you want to work in an established grooming shop, work from home, or even set up a mobile dog grooming business and travel to a client’s home.

How to Tell If Your Dog Has Arthritis

Monday, June 8th, 2015

You can tell if your dog has arthritis by watching for a number of symptoms. Arthritis in dogs is a condition affecting the skeletal system causing the joints in the legs to swell up and become painful. The disease can severely limit the ability of the dog to perform certain movements.

How to Tell if Your Dog Has Arthritis

The most noticeable symptoms of arthritis in a dog include limping; a lack of flexibility in the legs; sustained inactivity where a dog may not move from one spot all day long; fatigue to the point of not wanting to go on its usual walks; irritability if you touch its affected limbs or joints; a recognizable change in appetite; sleep patterns that have changed significantly (the dog sleeps more during the day and may be awake at night due to pain); and an intolerance to cold, causing the dog to seek out warmer areas of the house to lie down or sleep.

Arthritis occurs in dogs normally after the age of 7 or 8 and can affect dogs of any breed. Larger dog breeds have a tendency to develop arthritis at an earlier age. Arthritis is considered a disease of old age and affects approximately one in every five dogs. However, younger dogs can also develop arthritis.

If your dog has arthritis, it may experience either mild or severe pain due to swelling of the joints.

The only way to truly know if your dog has arthritis is to consult a veterinarian who will determine if the problem is arthritis or whether the pain is due to some other cause. The vet will probably take X-rays and may perform a bone density test before making a diagnosis.

Arthritis is not a reversible condition and there is no cure for it, but the pain can be controlled by placing your dog on a daily regimen of Winston’s Joint System, a combination of three, totally-natural whole food supplements developed by a Naturopathic Doctor for his own dog.

Dogs suffering with joint diseases such as arthritis, bursitis, osteochondrosis (OCD), hip dysplasia and other degenerative problems with the shoulders, elbows and hocks can experience immediate and long-term relief with Winston’s Joint System. The supplement also includes an anti-inflammatory agent to help reduce pain.

Daily exercise of some sort is recommended for any dog that has arthritis. If your dog loves water, swimming is an excellent form of exercise for dogs with arthritis because the buoyancy of the water can help by making the dog’s joints feel pain free.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis and all joint, pain and mobility issues.
 
There is an excellent chance we can help your dog, so please contact us at: www.dogshealth.com or call our toll free number at 888-901-5557.

Cataracts and Eye Problems in Dogs

Monday, May 4th, 2015


One of the most common conditions that affect a dog’s eyes are cataracts. The formation of cataracts in dogs can be caused by various things. All breeds and ages of dogs can develop cataracts but certain breeds are more susceptible to cataracts than others; among these are Cocker Spaniels, Poodles, Miniature Schnauzers, and Terriers.

Cataracts are an interference of lens fibers that obstruct sight by blocking clarity in the lens, either partially or totally. Smaller cataracts may not disrupt a dog’s vision at first, but the cataract could grow in size and density and cause a dog to lose its sight entirely if the cataract is not removed.

Cataracts that form in dogs over 6 years of age are called “senile cataracts.” When cataracts develop much earlier than this they are called “developmental cataracts.” Developmental cataracts can be hereditary or caused by trauma, infection, toxicity, or diabetes. “Inherited cataracts” are common in Standard Poodles, Afghan Hounds, Miniature Schnauzers, Old English Sheepdogs, and Welsh Springer Spaniels.

Congenital cataracts are present at birth; developmental cataracts develop early in a dog’s life; senile cataracts occur in dogs over six years of age, and inherited cataracts occur independently or in association with other visual diseases. Cataracts can also be caused by a trauma related to an auto accident or an object penetrating the eye. In trauma cases, the lens becomes damaged and a cataract may develop.

As a dog ages, eye health becomes a major concern. Over time, free radicals can cause oxidative stress on the cells of the eyes, and as a consequence, dogs have more difficulty fighting oxidative stress as they get older.

Exposure to oxygen and sunlight causes a chemical reaction in the cells, and the lens of the eyes are affected by this oxidative action because the lens acts as a light shield for the retina. Blood flow also decreases as the animal ages, resulting in nutrients being slowly depleted from the eye, causing even more stress and damage.

Dog cataracts are not a problem you might face only if you have an older dog. Cataracts can form at a fairly early age in some breeds. Afghan Hounds can develop cataracts at age 6-12 months, American Cocker Spaniels at 6 months or slightly older, German Shepherds at 8 weeks, Golden Retrievers at 6 months or later, Labrador Retrievers at 6 months or later, Siberian Huskies at 6 months or later, and the Standard Poodle at a year or later.

Cataracts are easy to identify by their white or bluish-white appearance in the pupil of the eye. If you suspect that your dog has or is developing cataracts or an eye problem, contact a veterinary ophthalmologist immediately.

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