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Joint Issues

  • Hip Dysplasia
  • Arthritis
  • Osteochondritis (OCD)
  • Stiffness/Inflammation
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  • Growing Pains
  • Mobility Problems
  • Joint Pain
  • Back/Spinal Problems
  • Hypertrophic Osteodystrophy (HOD)

Symptoms

Is your pet becoming less active, less playful, or desiring shorter walks? The following symptoms could be early signs of OCD, Arthritis or Hip Dysplasia.

  • Moving more slowly
  • Difficulty getting up
  • Weight shift to another leg
  • Personality change
  • Reluctant to walk, jump or play
  • Refuses using stairs or the car
  • Change in appetite
  • Change in behavior
  • Muscle atrophy
  • Lagging behind
  • Yelping when touched
  • Limping
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Archive for the ‘Canine Dog Obedience’ Category

How To Give Your Dog a Pill

Monday, May 2nd, 2016


If you’ve recently taken your dog to the vet and were given medication to treat an illness or ailment, chances are good that the medication came in the form of a pill. But suppose your dog hates being given a pill because of the taste or for other reasons. If you have an intransigent and uncooperative dog, here are some clues on how to give your dog a pill.

Probably the easiest way to give your dog a pill is to hide it in a piece of its food. If that doesn’t work (and many a dog is smart enough to eat the food and spit out the pill) try putting the pill in a small amount of peanut butter or cream cheese. This usually provides a good incentive for your dog to take the medication without being aware of it. If you decide to put the pill in the dog’s food, feed a small amount of the food separately before inserting the pill.

One mistake some people make is to crush the pill and mix it into the dog’s regular food. The problem with this approach is if the dog doesn’t eat the whole meal, it won’t be getting the benefit of the correct dosage of medication it needs.

If your dog refuses to take the pill in its food or the medication cannot be administered with food, you’ll need to try a different tack to get your pet to take its medicine.

One way is to hold the pill between your thumb and index finger. Holding your dog’s muzzle with the other hand, gently grasp the dog’s muzzle from above, placing your thumb on one side and your fingers on the other side.

Squeeze behind the dog’s upper canine teeth and tilt its head back over the shoulders so it’s looking at the ceiling. This will cause the lower jaw to automatically drop a bit.

Place a finger between the lower canine teeth (the long front teeth) and push down to lower the dog’s bottom jaw.

Quickly put the pill as far back in your dog’s mouth as possible, getting it over the ‘hump’ of the tongue. Be careful not to put your hand in too far or your dog may gag.

Close your dog’s mouth. While holding the mouth closed, lower the head to a normal position to make it easier for your dog to swallow the pill. If your dog will not swallow the pill after this action try rubbing or blowing on your dog’s nose to help stimulate it to swallow the pill.

When your dog finally swallows the pill, praise it and offer a treat. This will make it easier the next time you need to administer a pill.

If this seems too difficult or confusing to you, ask one of the veterinarian staff to demonstrate this method for you. Then when you’re at home and need to give your dog a pill you’ll know exactly what to do.

Safer Trips with a Dog Car Seat

Monday, April 4th, 2016


A dog car seat can make car rides safer for both you and your dog by confining your pet to a safe space, keeping it off your lap and avoiding danger in case of an accident.

Dogs can be an problematic distraction when you’re driving. Dogs who aren’t well-behaved can distract you by barking out the window or jumping on your lap while you’re driving.

Even well-behaved dogs should be secured in a dog car seat when riding in the car with you because airbags can cause serious injury to your dog just as they can to a young child.

Another life-threatening concern is that your dog might fly right through the windshield if it’s sitting on your lap or standing on your front seat. Securing your dog in one of these seats protects it from the impact of a crash, and keeps it from distracting you while you’re driving.

An unrestrained dog can become a deadly projectile in the event of an impact, potentially causing injury to you, your dog and any other persons riding in the vehicle.

Another concern is that in the event of a serious accident, your dog may escape from your car and run away in fear; even worse would be if your dog became violent trying to protect you from emergency personnel who may need to act quickly to save your life.

For safer trips with a dog car seat, be sure to choose the appropriate size for your dog. The seat can be used as a booster seat in the front, raised high enough to allow your dog to see out the window easily, or if you wish, it can be secured in the back seat.

There are also varieties of car seats that attach to your car’s middle console in the front or back seat. Most of these models are available only for small dogs, but it is possible to find dog car seats that can hold a large dog.

If your dog isn’t comfortable being fastened into a dog car seat, you can buy special harnesses to secure it when traveling. These harnesses attach to the seat belts in your back seat and allow your dog limited freedom to roam around the back seat while the car is moving. Harnesses are available for all sizes of dogs.

You can also purchase nets and gates that will block your dog in the back seat and are available for sedans and SUV’s. Although these products won’t protect your dog in the event of an impact, they will prevent a dog from flying through the windshield.

No matter which method you use protect your dog when driving, please have a safer trip with your pet safely ensconced in a dog car seat. Car seats, safety nets and seatbelts are available at all local pet stores.

Raising Dogs and Cats in the Same House

Monday, March 7th, 2016


Dogs and cats are not sworn enemies. They often live together in the same house without problems. If you are raising both dogs and cats in the same house, there are some rules that should be followed so the animals can coexist in peace.

If you adopt a cat and dog at the same time when they are young, they can easily adapt to living together and even become good friends, or at the very worst, learn to tolerate each other.

Each pet will need its own space in order to feel comfortable and safe. You’ll also need to be sure each pet is fed enough food or one of them will attempt to steal the other’s food.

If you have a dog or a cat that’s used to being the only animal in the house, adopting a new pet is not always an agreeable event for the pet who has established your house as their sole domain You’ll need to make sure you introduce the new pet gradually so there won’t be fights and the pets will be able to adjust to one another.

When you bring a new pet into your house, you should keep it isolated from the other for a short period of time, allowing it to interact with your existing pet for just a few minutes each day until you are convinced that there will be no problems between them; or if there is, the problems will be minor.

As the pets become better acquainted you can increase the length of time they spend together. This will allow both pets to feel more comfortable. The old pet won’t feel threatened by the new one and the new pet won’t tend to be aggressive toward the other in an attempt to establish its territory.

Dogs are usually more likely to accept a new cat. However, some cats may never accept a new dog and will always be hostile towards it.

If you are going to raise both dogs and cats in the same house and don’t want to make the old pet jealous of the new one, don’t show more affection towards the new pet, even if the new pet is a puppy or a kitten. The old pet may feel neglected and may develop an attitude towards the new pet.

How Often Do I Need To Walk My Dog

Monday, February 15th, 2016


Do you walk your dog once a day, twice a day, or sometimes more? How often do you need to walk your dog?

A dog needs to be walked regularly, both for exercise and for potty breaks. Walking your dog is also important for both its physical and mental health. There is no concrete answer to how often a dog needs to be walked, but there are some general guidelines you can follow.

Some dogs only need to be walked once a day, while others will need four or more daily walks. Before my own dog became pretty much immobile from hip dysplasia and arthritis, he needed to go on four or five daily walks, although I always suspected he didn’t really need that many walks but just wanted to get out and scope the neighborhood as often as he could.

The average dog needs at least two short walks every day. Fifteen minutes or less is usually enough for most dogs, especially small ones, so they can take care of their physical needs while getting in a little exercise for good health.

Some of the factors that determine how often you need to walk your dog include the following:
(1) If you work long hours, you may only be able to take your dog out once in the morning before work, and again when you come home;
(2) The size of the dog; smaller dogs need fewer and shorter walks;
(3) The breed of the dog, because some dogs have small bladders;
(4) The energy level of your dog. A dog with a high energy level needs longer or more frequent walks to expend excess energy;
(5) The type of food you feed your pet. Feeding a dog solid foods like kibble doesn’t require potty breaks as often as does a dog who eats a diet of mainly soft foods.

Regardless of the type of food, a dog will need short walks to urinate and exercise.

If your dog comes down with diarrhea, you’ll obviously need more frequent walks to prevent accidents from happening. If your dog becomes ill and is not able to go outside, you’ll have to avoid walks until your dog feels better.

One of the real, measurable benefits to walking your dog is that it provides the dog with exercise, which is necessary to prevent obesity and muscle atrophy, and it gives you the opportunity to exercise by walking which will help increase both your stamina and health.

One additional benefit to walking your dog is that you’ll meet lots of new people who want to pet your dog and possibly strike up a conversation with you. You might be amazed if you knew how many people ended up eventually marrying after first having had a friendly conversation about their pet dogs.

Married couples can also look forward to meeting friendly neighbors with whom they may eventually become close friends with. But single women should beware of the single guy who adopts a pet dog for the sole purpose of meeting attractive, single women on his daily dog walks.

Jack Russell Terrier Training Tips

Monday, January 11th, 2016


Jack Russell terrier training is essential, especially if you adopt a Jack Russell when it’s a puppy. Like most terriers, Jack Russells were bred to hunt and kill rodents and they have a lot of energy. Because of that energy, they require a lot of exercise, training and mental stimulation to live peacefully in a family situation without driving everyone crazy with their antics.

During adolescence Jack Russells have loads of energy, and it’s almost impossible to train one unless it’s getting the proper amount of exercise; this means up to an hour and a half of active running each and every day.

If not allowed to run full bore and burn up excess energy, Jack Russells will find things to do – things like tearing up cushions on sofas and chairs, ripping up plants in the garden, and chewing on every shoe in the house. It’s easy to understand why an owner needs to be sure that a Jack Russell terrier gets a lot of outdoor exercise.

Jack Russell terriers are easily distracted, and without exercise, those distractions can result in non-stop barking, in the house and outdoors as well.

Jack Russell terriers were bred to be diggers as most rodents live underground. If you don’t want your garden or yard dug up every week, you might want to put a sand box in your back yard and let the dog’s natural instincts for digging take over. You may need to put some of the dog’s toys and bones in the sandbox to spur it’s digging activities.

To stop a Jack Russell from chewing on everything in your house, you’ll have to limit the dog’s access to certain areas of the house during the day when no one is home. When family members are home they can guide the dog away from items you don’t want it to chew on and redirect it to things that are okay to chew on.

The most effective way to accomplish this is to teach the dog a “Leave it” command by holding several treats. Give the dog a couple of treats while saying “Take it.” Then close your fist and say, “Leave it.” Wait for the barking to stop, then give praise and reward with a treat.

Once the Jack Russell learns to obey these commands, you can start practicing with objects the dog likes to chew but should not be messing with. These could be shoes, remote TV controls, or anything lying around the house that seems to be irresistible to the dog’s attention. When the dog obeys your command to leave the object alone, reward it with a treat or one of its chewing toys.

These dogs make great pets, but instituting Jack Russell terrier training and seeing that it has plenty of exercise, will make them a welcome addition to almost any family.

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