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The #1 source for immediate, long-term relief for dogs suffering from degenerative diseases like hip dysplasia, OCD and arthritis.

We are specialists in the treatment of canine joint disease and its accompanying pain.

Let us help put an end to your dog’s suffering, joint stiffness, pain, immobility, and poor quality of life. Our proven products will help you easily accomplish this without the use of drugs or invasive surgery.

Joint Issues

  • Hip Dysplasia
  • Arthritis
  • Osteochondritis (OCD)
  • Stiffness/Inflammation
  • Ligament Tears
  • Growing Pains
  • Mobility Problems
  • Joint Pain
  • Back/Spinal Problems
  • Hypertrophic Osteodystrophy (HOD)

Symptoms

Is your pet becoming less active, less playful, or desiring shorter walks? The following symptoms could be early signs of OCD, Arthritis or Hip Dysplasia.

  • Moving more slowly
  • Difficulty getting up
  • Weight shift to another leg
  • Personality change
  • Reluctant to walk, jump or play
  • Refuses using stairs or the car
  • Change in appetite
  • Change in behavior
  • Muscle atrophy
  • Lagging behind
  • Yelping when touched
  • Limping
We Can Help!
 

Archive for the ‘Pet Health Problems’ Category

Living with a Blind Dog

Monday, July 18th, 2016


Living with a blind dog can be a challenging undertaking, both for the dog and for its owner who now must be the eyes for both of them.

A dog who suddenly develops blindness is usually able to adjust to living life without its vision which has been an important and indispensable sense all its life.

More than likely your dog has a good appetite which will not be affected by the loss of sight. Just help guide your pet to its food and water bowls until it gets used to locating them itself. Some owners whose dogs have lost their sight find that adding a little lemon to the water bowl gives the water a scent the dog can detect from a distance.

To properly care for your dog and to be sure that you are helping it all you can, you may need to make some adjustments to your living space. The first thing you’ll probably notice is that your pet will bump into furniture and other objects around the house that it used to avoid without a second thought. It can take a while before your dog gets re-accustomed to the layout of your house and learns how to get around without bumping into furniture. To quickly illustrate how much of a problem this can be for your dog, close your own eyes and try maneuvering around your rooms without bumping into things.

If you have furniture with sharp corners, place foam pads on the corners to prevent serious injuries if your pet should bump into the sharp edges.

Don’t change the layout of your rooms in the early stages of your dog’s blindness. Keeping your furniture in the same positions allows your blind dog to familiarize itself with its suddenly “new” surroundings. Be extra careful not to leave large or sharp objects lying around on the floor if your dog is not used to encountering them in the room. Leaving something lying around that you wouldn’t even think could be a problem may end up injuring your dog.

If you have stairs in your home, don’t let your dog climb up and down them unless you are sure it can easily and safely maneuver them.

Your dog is probably used to going outside to play or simply relieve itself. Look carefully around your yard to check for rakes, mowers, or any other large objects that could cause injury to your pet.

If you have a swimming pool you’ll need to watch your dog carefully when it’s outside because it’s very easy for the dog to accidentally fall into your pool and possibly drown if you’re not there to help. If it’s not feasible to place a fence around your pool you’ll need to be aware of the dog’s whereabouts the entire time it’s outside.

After your dog has lost its sight it will take some time before it can begin to rely solely on its sense of smell and hearing rather than using its eyesight also. Helping your dog find objects when it’s having trouble adjusting will speed the process of it adapting to the blindness as long as you don’t do everything for your pet, making it completely dependent on your assistance.

Living with a blind dog does not mean you’re now charged with the responsibility of caring for an animal that will require your constant attention. The quicker you can help your pet adjust to this new way of life, the easier it will be for both of you and the sooner you’ll regain the full attention of your loving pet again.

Dogs With OCD

Monday, July 11th, 2016

Dogs with OCD (or Osteochondrosis) suffer a great deal of pain and mobility issues.

When a dog has OCD, fragments of bone and cartilage become detached from larger bones and end up floating around the area encompassing a dog’s joints. The result is that any movement in the joint where those fragments are located will cause a dog to suffer from severe pain.

Dogs With OCD (or osteochondrosis)

What is Osteochondrosis (OCD)

OCD is a congenital problem that usually affects only larger dogs who seem to be predisposed to the condition.

The best way to understand the true cause of this condition is that it is a disease of the cartilage that results in large pieces of cartilage and bone becoming detached and floating freely. This causes a dog with OCD a lot of pain.

These free floating bone and cartilage pieces can lead to the development of arthritis, hip dysplasia, secondary degenerative joint disease, or other side effects.

There are several variations of osteochondrosis (OCD), and all typically affect the dog’s joints at the ankle, shoulder, elbow and knee on one or both sides of a dog’s body.

The different types of OCD are distinguished by their location on a dog’s body. They are also differentiated from each other based on the severity and the primary cause of the condition.

It’s more common for OCD to affect the forelimbs than a dog’s hind feet and legs.

Symptoms of OCD in dogs

To properly treat and identify OCD in your pet, you need to be able to recognize the symptoms of this disease. OCD can develop at any stage of a dog’s life, although it is more common in younger dogs than in older ones.

Dogs with OCD will show some of the following warning signs:

  • Pain when the affected limb is touched;
  • Muscle degeneration on the affected side of the dog’s body;
  • A general limitation of movement;
  • Lameness or difficulty moving around.

How to diagnose and treat OCD in dogs

A veterinarian will diagnose osteochondrosis using a series of X-ray tests.

Treatment of the disease requires lifestyle changes. The dog’s exercise routine must be changed to ensure that the dog can remain active and suffer fewer mobility problems.

Dogs suffering with joint diseases like OCD, arthritis, bursitis, hip dysplasia and other degenerative problems with the shoulders, elbows and hocks can find immediate and long-term relief without drugs with a regular regimen of Winston’s Joint System, a combination of three, totally-natural whole food supplements developed by a Naturopathic Doctor for his own dog. Winston’s contains no drugs and there are no side-effects.

Winston’s Pain Formula is another product proven to be fast acting and highly effective in relieving the pain in a dog caused by these diseases. Both of these products help your dog to recover much faster.

Dogs with OCD will require a change in diet and careful observation to prevent overfeeding and weight gain which contribute to damage of the joints due to OCD. Work with your vet to determine if your dog’s diet is properly supporting its joint health or if it can be changed to be more effective.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis and all joint, pain and mobility issues.
 
There is an excellent chance we can help your dog, so please contact us at: www.dogshealth.com or call our toll free number at 888-901-5557.

Why Dogs Vomit Undigested Food

Monday, June 20th, 2016


Dogs vomit undigested food occasionally and if this happens to your pet it shouldn’t be cause for alarm. It’s normal for dogs to vomit sometimes, but if the vomiting is accompanied by diarrhea or bloody stools, the dog should be examined by a vet and treated as soon as possible.

When a dog eats inedible food it can develop gastrointestinal problems resulting in vomiting. This can also occur with a sudden change in diet that a dog’s stomach is unable to handle. Regardless of the cause, most dogs suffering from indigestion will experience a painful contraction of the stomach muscles while trying to force out the undigested matter resulting in vomiting.

Indigestion causes two types of vomiting, acute and chronic. If your dog suddenly throws up after eating something inedible, acute vomiting may ensue. Very seldom will a dog with acute vomiting require medication to stop the vomiting and prevent dehydration. If it is required, a prescription medication will ease the digestive tract and help restore it to normality.

Chronic vomiting can be recognized when a dog continues to throw up undigested food once or twice a week. If this happens, the dog could be suffering from a stomach infection. Dogs with a weak digestive system are predisposed to indigestion, gastrointestinal intolerance and other sicknesses like inflammatory bowel syndrome. A dog with chronic vomiting will often refuse to eat. Chronic vomiting is usually associated with an inflammation of the intestines.

In order to determine the cause of indigestion and understand why a dog vomits undigested food, a series of diagnostic tests will be performed by a veterinarian, including blood tests, abdominal X-rays and an examination of the dog’s feces.

Mild cases of vomiting can easily be treated by changing a dog’s diet. However, if the cause of the vomiting is intestinal inflammation, the vet will usually prescribe drugs after determining the cause of the inflammation.

If a dog returns to normal after vomiting undigested food, there is no need to worry. However, if it exhibits other symptoms along with the vomiting, or if the condition worsens, the dog will need a medical diagnosis.

Removing Ticks From Dogs

Monday, June 13th, 2016


Removing ticks from your dog should be a priority as soon as you notice even one tick appearing on your dog’s skin. Many ticks can carry serious diseases like Lyme’s Disease.

The types of environments where ticks are usually found are places with thick vegetation, in tall grasses, bushes, and heavy brush in the woods where ticks have a lot of vegetation to crawl around on.

Removing a tick is not difficult but can be very upsetting to some dogs. To safely remove a tick from your dog’s skin, soak a cotton ball in mineral oil and hold it against the tick for about 30 seconds. Using tweezers to squeeze the dog’s skin surrounding the tick, grab the tick’s head between the tweezers, carefully pulling it out, making sure to remove its entire body.

Next swab the area with rubbing alcohol, and be sure to thoroughly wash your hands after removing all the ticks.

When removing a tick it’s important that you don’t twist or pull too hard on it as you may break the tick’s body, leaving part of it still attached to your dog’s skin. If a tick is not removed completely or correctly, it can leave your dog vulnerable to a number of diseases.

Another method of safely removing a tick from your dog is to rub the tick in a circular motion. Ticks do not like this movement and will oftentimes crawl out on their own, permitting you to easily remove them.

Be sure that you do not make any of these common mistakes when removing a tick from your dog:
(1) crushing the tick, as crushing it will allow its blood to enter your dog’s blood stream, and it may be carrying debilitating diseases;

(2) attempting to remove the tick with your fingers. This not only makes it too easy to crush the tick, but also exposes you to any potential diseases the tick may be carrying.

Ticks are nasty little creatures that neither you or your dog want to see. Learning how to properly remove them will help ensure your dog’s health and prevent the transmission of deadly diseases.

Asthma Treatments for Dogs

Monday, May 30th, 2016


Pet asthma is a medical condition that’s easy to diagnose in dogs and there are several different asthma treatments for dogs that can control the symptoms of this disease.

Asthma in dogs is defined as the sudden narrowing of a dog’s airways that causes breathing difficulties. Asthma can be triggered when a pet inhales something it’s allergic to. When this happens, the lower parts of the lungs begin to tighten and the dog will begin to wheeze or cough. Its gums may turn blue, and heavy panting ensues.

In extreme cases a dog will collapse from a lack of oxygen. This is why it’s important to consider every asthma attack as a medical emergency. Too much exercise or exertion can also trigger an asthma attack.

Some pets with asthma may have only occasional mild attacks, while others can have repeated attacks ranging from moderate to severe.

Diagnosing Asthma in Your Dog
A veterinarian will use a combination of tests which include x-rays and blood assessments as a way to diagnose asthma. This will help rule out other ailments or illnesses like airway obstructions, infections or heartworms that can cause the same symptoms as asthma.

Your veterinarian may have you keep a record of your dog’s asthma attacks in order to establish what triggers are causing the attacks. If your dog has a problem breathing after an energetic exercise period or when pollen counts are high where you live, keeping track of the attacks can help your veterinarian formulate the best treatment plan for your dog.

Traditional asthma treatments for dogs include administering steroids and antihistamines to help reduce swelling and control the allergic reactions.

In more serious asthma cases, it may be necessary to inject epinephrine during an attack to allow the dog to breathe easier. Your veterinarian will teach you how to give your dog injections of epinephrine if it has a very serious case of asthma.

Asthma treatments for dogs may also include alternative medical treatments, such as dietary supplements, herbal remedies or acupuncture.

Regardless of the type of medical treatment you choose for your dog, perhaps the most important thing you can do is to control the circumstances that trigger the asthma attacks. For example, if dust triggers the asthma attacks, you’ll need to find a way to filter out dust from the air inside your house. If you’re a smoker and your dog’s asthma attacks are triggered by cigarette smoke, you may need to quit smoking or only smoke in areas well away from your dog.

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