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We are specialists in the treatment of canine joint disease and its accompanying pain.

Let us help put an end to your dog’s suffering, joint stiffness, pain, immobility, and poor quality of life. Our proven products will help you easily accomplish this without the use of drugs or invasive surgery.

Joint Issues

  • Hip Dysplasia
  • Arthritis
  • Osteochondritis (OCD)
  • Stiffness/Inflammation
  • Ligament Tears
  • Growing Pains
  • Mobility Problems
  • Joint Pain
  • Back/Spinal Problems
  • Hypertrophic Osteodystrophy (HOD)

Symptoms

Is your pet becoming less active, less playful, or desiring shorter walks? The following symptoms could be early signs of OCD, Arthritis or Hip Dysplasia.

  • Moving more slowly
  • Difficulty getting up
  • Weight shift to another leg
  • Personality change
  • Reluctant to walk, jump or play
  • Refuses using stairs or the car
  • Change in appetite
  • Change in behavior
  • Muscle atrophy
  • Lagging behind
  • Yelping when touched
  • Limping
We Can Help!
 

Archive for the ‘Senior Dogs’ Category

Dog Sinus Infections

Monday, September 28th, 2015


A dog’s sinus cavities are located between its nasal cavities and skull. When a dog develops an upper respiratory tract infection it is also at risk of contracting a sinus infection.

When a dog has a sinus infection, the sinuses become inflamed and congested with fluid. This condition is often caused by fungal, viral or bacterial infection. A dog who is suffering from an upper respiratory tract infection is at the highest risk for falling victim to a sinus infection.

Insect bites or stings can also develop into a sinus infection. If a dog is overly exposed to smoke, dust, pollen or mold, its sinuses can become inflamed and lead to infection. In older dogs, health problems like abscessed teeth can often result in sinus infection.

When a dog develops a sinus infection it will sneeze often and may gag or cough. Its eyes and nose may begin to water and if the infection becomes severe, it could lead to bleeding from the nose.

A clear discharge from the eyes and nose usually is indicative of an allergy that may be due to inhaled dust or other irritants.

Dog sinus infections are often symptoms of a lesser upper respiratory tract infection or the common cold. But if the sinus symptoms last longer than two days it would be wise to make an appointment with a veterinarian.

Immediate emergency vet care is absolutely necessary if a dog develops a nosebleed. A dog with sinus infections can suffer from nosebleeds, but if they are severe, they usually are an indicator of a more serious condition.

The vet will do a complete physical exam and detailed medical history before being able to positively diagnose a dog’s sinus infection. The vet will closely examine the dog’s eyes and nose and take X-rays or an ultrasound to determine the degree of congestion.

Medication is usually prescribed to treat a dog’s sinus infection. If the vet determines that bacteria is responsible for the infection, the dog will be prescribed an antibiotic. If a fungus is responsible for the infection, anti-fungal medications will be prescribed rather than an antibiotic. If the dog’s sinus infection is viral, no medications will cure it and the infection is left to run its course.

If a dog comes down with a sinus infection it’s recommended that it stay inside the house and not go outside if it’s raining or cold. The dog should be kept as warm and dry as possible.

Health Problems in Older Dogs

Monday, September 7th, 2015

Owners of older dogs face special challenges in keeping their pets healthy. This necessitates remaining attentive to all the signs and symptoms of health problems in older dogs if you want to keep your pet healthy for as long as possible.

Health Problems in Older Dogs

Dogs are considered to have reached old age by the last third of the typical lifespan for their breed.

If you notice that your senior dog seems to have less energy than it used to, it’s simply due to a natural slowing of the dog’s metabolism.

Older dogs are at an increased risk of developing diseases in their later years. Common health problems in older dogs include arthritis, hip dysplasia, congestive heart failure, and kidney failure.

If you’ve allowed your dog to become obese or seriously overweight, it places extra stress on the dog and worsens all of these conditions. Therefore, it’s important to maintain an older dog’s ideal weight by combining the right diet and sufficient exercise.

Older dogs are more accident-prone than younger dogs, so it’s imperative that you help your dog prevent falling over objects in the house or yard. Also watch for large cracks and uplifted areas of sidewalks when taking your dog for a walk.

Health problems in older dogs

Three of the most serious health problems in older dogs are:

Arthritis and Hip Dysplasia
Arthritis usually worsens with age or may not develop until a dog is older. The disease causes significant joint pain and stiffness in dogs. A dog suffering from arthritis will experience impaired mobility and will limp or have difficulty running and climbing stairs.

Hip dysplasia is an abnormality of the hip joint and is one of the main causes of severe arthritis.

Regular non-strenuous exercise, combined with nutritional supplements like Winston’s Joint System, will help lessen the pain and discomfort caused by arthritis and hip dysplasia. Winston’s was designed to help dogs suffering with joint diseases like arthritis, bursitis, osteochondrosis (OCD), hip dysplasia and other degenerative problems obtain long-term relief without drugs.

Winston’s Pain Formula is an excellent addition to help ease a dog’s pain and discomfort. This powerful and natural pain relief product is fast-acting and highly effective. It works exceptionally well with Winston’s Joint System to help a dog recover much faster.

It’s also important that an obese or overweight dog lose weight to help take the pressure off its stressed joints caused by the arthritis or hip dysplasia.

Sleeping can also be a problem when the pain of arthritis or hip dysplasia is severe. To ease the pain in your dog, I recommend using the Canine Cooler Bed to soothe your dog’s inflammation and painful joints. It has really helped my older dog and he loves his bed.

Congestive Heart Failure
Congestive heart failure is a painful condition that can affect a dog at any age, but older and overweight dogs are more apt to succumb to this disease. Dogs with congestive heart failure accumulate fluid in their lung and chest cavities because their weakened heart can no longer efficiently pump their blood.

The symptoms of congestive heart failure include coughing, difficulty breathing, bluish tongue and gums, dizzy spells, sudden fatigue, a potbellied-looking abdomen, and weight loss. There is no cure for this disease and treatment consists only of drug therapy and vitamin supplements.

Your dog will need to be fed foods low in sodium and high in protein. Regular exercise is also very important. Should your dog collapse during exercise or any other activity, seek medical attention immediately as this is an emergency situation.

Kidney Failure
Aging usually impairs kidney function in dogs and can result in kidney failure.

Chronic kidney disease sometimes goes undetected for years. You should be alert to the symptoms of kidney disease which include excessive thirst, excessive urination, weight loss, and fatigue.

Being proactive about health problems in older dogs

Keeping your dog healthy becomes very important when it reaches old age. Graying hair and irritability are common in senior dogs but never assume that physical and behavioral changes are simply due to old age.

Keeping track of your dog’s illness symptoms, staying on schedule for its check-up appointments, and providing preventative care will help keep your dog feeling and acting younger.

Being proactive about your dog’s health will directly impact its life expectancy and ensure that any disease can be diagnosed at its beginning and treated in the early stages, improving the odds for recovery, or at least a more comfortable existence for you beloved pet as it ages.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis and all joint, pain and mobility issues.
 
There is an excellent chance we can help your dog, so please contact us at: www.dogshealth.com or call our toll free number at 888-901-5557.

Why Do Dogs Shake When Sleeping?

Monday, August 3rd, 2015


Does your dog shake when sleeping? Does it worry you? There can be several reasons for this shaking but they’re usually not indicative of something seriously wrong with your dog just because it shakes when asleep.

When a dog shakes while it’s sleeping it can be alarming because you can’t be sure what’s causing the shaking and whether it’s a natural occurrence, or if the dog may be in pain. When your dog is deep in REM sleep you may notice it shaking, crying, kicking, or moving its legs like it’s running.

Rapid eye movement (REM) is the sleep stage in which dreams happen. During REM a dog’s mind is fully active and aware, even though its body is in a completely calm state. The dog’s mind will replay images from events that happened that day or even past events, and its body will react to those images, causing involuntary movement during sleep. There have been many studies proving that dogs do experience REM sleep stage.

It is interesting that larger dog breeds don’t have dreams as frequently as do smaller dog breeds. If dreams are the reason for your dog’s actions, then you have nothing to be worried about.

If you notice these same movements occurring frequently when your dog is simply resting, it’s possible that your dog is having an epileptic seizure. Epileptic seizures stem from a disorder of the nerve cells in the dog’s brain and generally occur during consciousness but result in the dog losing consciousness. Nerve structures in the brain produce electrochemical signals and carry them to the brain where instructions to perform the various functions of the body are regulated. When these signals become scrambled, the result is an epileptic seizure.

During an epileptic seizure a dog may bite, snap or jerk, hurting its owner or itself. Since epileptic seizures cause unconsciousness, the dog will have no recollection of this behavior. Epileptic seizures do not seem to be controllable and tend to recur over the life of a dog.

There are other causes for seizures in dogs such as tumors, kidney and liver disorders, infections, brain damage and toxins. A low oxygen level in the blood or blood glucose levels that are too high can also cause seizures. A dog might have a partial seizure affecting only parts of its body or a generalized seizure called a grand mal that affects the entire body. Grand mal is the most severe type of seizure.

Although not very common, tremors in dogs can also be caused by abnormal cardiac contractions and restricted blood flow within the heart. This results in erratic involuntary movements. If this occurs while the dog is sleeping or awake, you should ask your veterinarian to give your dog a complete medical examination.

How to be a Pet Groomer

Monday, July 20th, 2015


Are you thinking about starting a career as a pet groomer? Pet grooming is ideal for people who love animals, but make no bones about it, a career in the pet grooming business can be difficult to get started in. But once you’ve established yourself as a qualified and experienced groomer it can be a very rewarding career and a lot of fun working with dogs of all sizes and types of coats.

To become a successful pet groomer you’ll need to enroll in a professional grooming school. These schools can be found in the yellow pages of your local directory, or for quicker searching use the internet. Professional schools provide their students with the tools, techniques and skills needed to break into the pet grooming profession.

It may surprise you to know that many people who work as dog groomers haven’t attended a professional school, but instead learned the grooming procedures and techniques by taking correspondence courses or night classes at their local college.

As a new dog groomer just starting in the business, it helps to get a job with an established grooming shop as a trainee or assistant. Working for a good dog grooming service will provide you with hands-on experience and the additional training needed to assist you in propelling your career forward in the pet grooming business.

There are many different breeds of dogs, all requiring special techniques for proper grooming. As a dog groomer you’ll have to know how to groom every breed of dog. For example, the grooming style of a Golden Retriever is very different than that of a Yorkie.

When you have been trained and are starting your career, you can ask friends and family if they will let you practice your grooming skills on their pet dogs at no cost to them. This will help you in improving your skills and your friends and family will probably be eager to give you a good reference when you’re searching for the right place in which to begin your career.

When you’re finally ready to be a pet groomer and you feel comfortable enough to proudly say so, you can choose whether you want to work in an established grooming shop, work from home, or even set up a mobile dog grooming business and travel to a client’s home.

Urinary Incontinence in Older Dogs

Monday, July 6th, 2015


It is not uncommon for older dogs to have incontinence problems; even younger dogs can have this disorder if they have a congenital deformity or have experienced an injury to the nerves that control the bladder muscles. However, urinary incontinence in older dogs is a far more common problem for anyone who owns an aging dog.

Understanding how a dog’s bladder works will shed some light on the problem. Dogs store urine in their bladder and when they need to urinate, the urine passes out of the body through the urethra. Normally, a dog is able to control the passage of urine, but if it loses control over the bladder the result is incontinence.

A band of muscles at the base of a dog’s bladder creates a valve that keeps urine from leaking out of the bladder. Dogs produce hormones that help them control these muscles consciously. Estrogen helps strengthen the bladder muscles in female dogs, and testosterone strengthens the same muscles in male dogs.

But as dogs age their bodies produce fewer of the hormones estrogen and testosterone. A dog that has been spayed or neutered is more likely to suffer hormone deficiencies. When this happens, urinary incontinence causes small amounts of urine to leak out of the dog’s bladder while it’s resting or sleeping.

Older dogs are most prone to urinary incontinence though younger animals can develop the condition due to congenital abnormalities or injury. Urinary incontinence in an older dog will usually begin to manifest itself when a dog is about eight or nine years old. Spayed females can develop urinary incontinence as early as three to five years of age.

Treatment for urinary incontinence in older dogs usually includes an oral medication prescribed by your vet. Phenylpropanolamine is the most common, non-hormonal drug used for both male and female dogs. Sometimes a vet will recommend hormone replacement therapy to treat urinary incontinence in an older dog. In these cases, daily doses of hormone substitutes need to be administered when treatment is begun, and once the dog begins to respond to treatment, the dosage schedule is reduced to once a week.

Side effects from hormone replacement drugs are rare in dogs. In some cases the medication doesn’t completely clear up the incontinence symptoms. If that happens, your dog will probably need to wear a dog diaper during the day and night.

Older dogs with urinary incontinence are also more susceptible to bladder infections because the muscles at the base of the bladder become looser, making it easier for bacteria to enter the dog’s organ. If this happens to your dog, antibiotics prescribed by your veterinarian can be helpful in treating any bladder infections.

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